LG Display says its next-gen OLED EX tech can increase picture brightness up to 30 percent

midian182

Posts: 7,782   +80
Staff member
Why it matters: While OLED televisions have several advantages over LCD-LED sets, one area where they can’t compete is the brightness. But LG Display says its next-generation OLED EX technology solves this problem, enhancing brightness up to 30 percent compared to conventional OLED displays.

OLED EX, the latter part an acronym of 'Evolution' and 'eXperience,' has the same distinctive OLED characteristic whereby each pixel emits light independently without requiring a separate backlight, resulting in perfect blacks, faster refresh rates, and no blooming.

The biggest issue with OLEDs is that most sets currently peak at around 500 – 600 nits, lower than what many high-end non-OLED televisions are capable of reaching, but LG Display addressed this by converting the hydrogen elements present in organic light emitting elements into stable deuterium, enhancing their stability and efficiency, allowing them to emit more light.

"Deuterium is twice as heavy as normal Hydrogen, and only a small amount exists in the natural world – as only one atom of Deuterium is found in about 6,000 ordinary Hydrogen atoms," writes the company. "LG Display has worked out how to extract deuterium from water and apply it to organic light-emitting devices. When stabilized, the Deuterium compounds allow the display to emit brighter light while maintaining high efficiency for a long time."

LG Display adds that OLED EX brings improved color accuracy, too. It uses personalized algorithms to predict the usage of 33 million OLED diodes in an 8K display so it "precisely controls the display's energy input to more accurately express the details and colors of the video content being played."

The technology can also benefit the physical design of a TV. LG Display says it has been able to reduce the bezel thickness from the original 6 mm to 4 mm on 65-inch OLED displays.

LGD notes that is has sold more than 10 million OLED TVs over the last two years, and despite the global TV market declining 12 percent this year, it still saw a 70 percent growth in OLED sales through 2021.

LG Display will integrate OLED EX technology into all of its OLED TV panels from Q2 2022. Let's hope it works as well as the company claims.

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Burty117

Posts: 4,463   +2,644
Well, I've been wanting to buy an OLED TV for some time, I guess I can wait another 9 months and see if these deliver.
 

VitalyT

Posts: 6,173   +6,656
I don't follow. LG has been bragging its super-bright OLED-s with HDR2000 for 2 years, and now suddenly they aren't bright enough?

OLEDs is that most sets currently peak at around 500 – 600
What's the most OLED-s? LG has been selling OLED-s with peak brightness of 1500-2000 for 2 years now. Where is this coming from?

Or did LG figure that the only way for them to sell this "updated" OLED is by bushing their own tech from before? This makes no sense.
 

Daniele 00

Posts: 159   +121
Uhm. about the title: Does a e 30% more brightness really makes it competitive ? o_0.
To me having a 30% more brightness is pretty irrelevant... in general. You can manage it by fixing the environnement light.
On the contrary, the "pro" of an OLED are far heavier than the minus. Real contrast (infinite they say), Real pixel color transition.. low lag... make it 144hz and you can play shot/shot games for real. Beautiful colors.
I'm waiting till the costs of Oled monitor become low for normal costumers to buy.
 

fps4ever

Posts: 867   +1,285
I don't follow. LG has been bragging its super-bright OLED-s with HDR2000 for 2 years, and now suddenly they aren't bright enough?


What's the most OLED-s? LG has been selling OLED-s with peak brightness of 1500-2000 for 2 years now. Where is this coming from?

Or did LG figure that the only way for them to sell this "updated" OLED is by bushing their own tech from before? This makes no sense.

Yeah "peak brightness" is a marketing thing. Real use you can cut that by 2/3's give or take. Rtings dot com tests real world brightness on the most popular models to give you real numbers.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 155   +139
Considering the TV Sony promised as the Next Gen gaming TV with the X90H. I'm in the market for an actual Next Gen gaming TV. Never again buying a Sony TV. LG seems to have their act together, definitely going to keep an eye on this TV.
 

DZillaXx

Posts: 486   +621
I don't follow. LG has been bragging its super-bright OLED-s with HDR2000 for 2 years, and now suddenly they aren't bright enough?


What's the most OLED-s? LG has been selling OLED-s with peak brightness of 1500-2000 for 2 years now. Where is this coming from?

Or did LG figure that the only way for them to sell this "updated" OLED is by bushing their own tech from before? This makes no sense.

I only really care about whole screen picture brightness and OLEDs in general have been on the lower side of what I'd like from a TV. 1000nits in a TV is a must if you want the picture to really pop, I could care less if a TV can do 1500nits in a small little window.

LG never stated their TV's are even capable of close to 1000nits of full screen brightness. The best OLEDs have the brightness of mid to higher end range LCD panels. Their black level make the picture pop with a dimmer screen, but in a sunny room the lack of brightness has always been the downside of this TV tech.
 

Burty117

Posts: 4,463   +2,644
I don't follow. LG has been bragging its super-bright OLED-s with HDR2000 for 2 years, and now suddenly they aren't bright enough?
Na LG have struggled with brightness on their OLED's since they invented them, they cannot uniformly get bright enough, the marketing is based on a small amount of the screen for a short duration, so basically useless information.

This video might be a little boring but it shows and explains why a higher brightness affects the image quality so substantially:
Considering the TV Sony promised as the Next Gen gaming TV with the X90H. I'm in the market for an actual Next Gen gaming TV. Never again buying a Sony TV. LG seems to have their act together, definitely going to keep an eye on this TV.
What was wrong with the Sony TV? I also plan on getting an LG next but my current set is a few year old Sony and apart from some appalling firmware updates it's been pretty good.
 

umbala

Posts: 603   +1,007
OLED this and OLED that. Wake me up when they've discovered OLED tech without severe burn-in issues. There's a reason you don't see many OLED monitors, and it's the burn-in issue. I know people will argue that it's not as noticeable on TVs, but it's still there and it's pretty bad.
 

Burty117

Posts: 4,463   +2,644
OLED this and OLED that. Wake me up when they've discovered OLED tech without severe burn-in issues. There's a reason you don't see many OLED monitors, and it's the burn-in issue. I know people will argue that it's not as noticeable on TVs, but it's still there and it's pretty bad.
If you use a TV like a TV, and not a monitor, it's a non-issue as nothing is static on the TV for a long enough period of time for it to burn in.

As you say though, if you use OLED like a monitor, it's far more of an issue, menu bars and what not are always in the same place at all times which is a big no no for OLED.

I think we're going to have to wait for microLED to mature before we get anything close to OLED without the burn-in issues.
Samsung is about to jump into the OLED market with the QD-OLED in 2022 which I'm watching out for as combining OLED with a Quantum Dot layer could definitely help with burn-in and longevity since at the very least, the OLED won't need to go so bright in order to produce the same brightness levels as we have today.

I know a few people who have OLED TV's and use them for playing games on the PlayStation, watching TV and watching movies and there is no burn-in on either, not even a little bit, on the other hand, Linus recently did a video showing the burn-in issues and it most definitely is an issue when used as a monitor.
 

Daniele 00

Posts: 159   +121
Na LG have struggled with brightness on their OLED's since they invented them, they cannot uniformly get bright enough, the marketing is based on a small amount of the screen for a short duration, so basically useless information.

This video might be a little boring but it shows and explains why a higher brightness affects the image quality so substantially:

What was wrong with the Sony TV? I also plan on getting an LG next but my current set is a few year old Sony and apart from some appalling firmware updates it's been pretty good.
Thank you for the video, it was interesting. Anyway that guy, at the end of the video, said that for SDR videos the brightning of OLED technology is enough, while for HDR it is important to have more brightning. This is an important part cuz most of pc users go with SDR, just a minority uses HDR. I cannot tell for the future of course but I can say that for now I can have a decent SDR by adjusting my environnement light.
 
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brucek

Posts: 1,107   +1,643
OLED this and OLED that. Wake me up when they've discovered OLED tech without severe burn-in issues. There's a reason you don't see many OLED monitors, and it's the burn-in issue. I know people will argue that it's not as noticeable on TVs, but it's still there and it's pretty bad.
My OLED TV does not have "pretty bad" burn in issues. But I agree, I would feel cautious about using it as a computer monitor. I have not had any trouble with regular (moving picture) video content.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,670   +7,575
"LG Display says its next-gen OLED EX tech can increase picture brightness up to 30 percent"

Just in case you missed the opportunity to stare at the sun and bun our your retina's the last time the sun was out ......
 

netman

Posts: 754   +317
I only really care about whole screen picture brightness and OLEDs in general have been on the lower side of what I'd like from a TV. 1000nits in a TV is a must if you want the picture to really pop, I could care less if a TV can do 1500nits in a small little window.

LG never stated their TV's are even capable of close to 1000nits of full screen brightness. The best OLEDs have the brightness of mid to higher end range LCD panels. Their black level make the picture pop with a dimmer screen, but in a sunny room the lack of brightness has always been the downside of this TV tech.

I have no issue watching my LG 65-inch OLED TV in my bright sunny living room...! At some point in pm hours, the sun hit the corner of the TV screen and the picture still is good to watch...!

BTW- the TV is working flawlessly since 2016...!
 
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nodfor

Posts: 209   +369
I find my LG OLED to be very bright and have turned down the settings
My current settings are
OLED light 12 / 100
Contrast 55 / 100
Brightness 40 / 100

My main worry is burn in although I am taking several measures to prevent it and have seen no signs of it on almost 2 years of high usage.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 988   +739
I'll just wait for the tritium version.

Sony & Panasonic models with heat sinks can get to near 1000nits

I think what is probably more interesting is better colour at higher brightness. Ie as you turn up brightness - colour tends to desaturate - so this will be targeting top LED from Samsung and LG itself.
Even Samsung is moving to OLED - putting all the extra things/layers in to boost LEDs is expensive.

OLEDs will have a cheap screens coming as well - as some Chinese company can now 3D print them - not sure of quality , or when coming to market - but show only be a year or 2 away

Plus anyone who buys a 65 or 77 or 83 inch OLED for the first time this year - will have a large upgrade - that they will be super happy with . I'm just waiting for the hdmi 2.1 to be resolved really well - should be 2022 so really future proofed - plus I think better chips will give lots of leeway for updates . At moment pushing chips to limit - Panasonic managed to get VRR working with a few limitations - Sony hasn't yet , Samsung and LG do their own chips - I know LG has a few problems doing somethings fully - ie you want 120hertz , 4K, DV, HDR plus to all work together ( well DV or HDR plus with others )- think it's 8K +30hertz is the same output . LG's 88 inch 8K OLED is only $25 000 plus
 
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Mr Majestyk

Posts: 1,146   +1,044
Still rocking my Panasonic VT60 plasma screen. Waiting for next big improvements, 2020 and 2021 TV updates have been pathetic. I hope Samsung's new QD-OLED offer us some decent alternatives to LG and Sony given Panasonic pulled out of Australia.
 

Watzupken

Posts: 574   +477
So now it is all about chasing after higher brightness level. My impression is that one of the reasons why OLEDs are deliberately made less bright is because of the issue with burn in. In any case, I don't really see the point of chasing after the brightness level. It sounds good on paper, but I don't think many people actually will utilise the brightness at 100%. In HDR content, it is nice to have, but I don't think current OLED displays are lacking. I don't want to be wearing sunglasses when watching HDR shows.
 

bandit8623

Posts: 363   +196
I only really care about whole screen picture brightness and OLEDs in general have been on the lower side of what I'd like from a TV. 1000nits in a TV is a must if you want the picture to really pop, I could care less if a TV can do 1500nits in a small little window.

LG never stated their TV's are even capable of close to 1000nits of full screen brightness. The best OLEDs have the brightness of mid to higher end range LCD panels. Their black level make the picture pop with a dimmer screen, but in a sunny room the lack of brightness has always been the downside of this TV tech.
only true if you cant control the light in a room.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,544   +7,385
As you say though, if you use OLED like a monitor, it's far more of an issue, menu bars and what not are always in the same place at all times which is a big no no for OLED.
"Forward into the past". The last time monitors suffered "burn in issues", was with CRT screens.
 

bviktor

Posts: 789   +1,202
No one cares. The issue isn't brightness, it's burn-in. It's still burn-in. It's always been burn-in. And as it stands, it's never going to be sorted out with OLED.

MicroLED is the answer to the ultimate picture question. It's still a few years away, yes, but it's coming. The 100"+ segment is already there, but obviously, it's prohibitively expensive. Yet. Give it 5 more years, and it'll be fine. The thing is, it could be much accelerated if they let go of the gimmick called 8K. The pixels could be bigger then, making the whole endeavor cheaper.

In any case, say no both to OLED (burn-in) and MiniLED (blooming).

Regards,
a disappointed MiniLED customer
 

Porkous

Posts: 157   +47
I respect these companies for the tech they develop, or that comes by universities research all over the globe.

Only so few sales, though. In the mean time, lending the tech to other companies so in the end we get to see companies like Sony leaving the phone market, when they were first to develop crucial technologies. Its beyond me how they do it. I hope LG provides the sinew for better living and stays on top of the sales.