Mediaworkstations a-XP is a luggable PC with AMD Threadripper inside

Humza

Posts: 707   +159
Staff member
Why it matters: The performance gap between desktop and mobile hardware still exists, which is why products like Mediaworkstation's a-XP are created to offer the ultimate in computing power out on the field. This portable workstation might stretch the definition of mobility somewhat, given that it weighs over 10kg (23 lbs) in basic spec. It does, however, make up for that bulk with beastly processing power courtesy of AMD's 64-core 128-thread 3990X Threadripper and Nvidia's professional/consumer-grade graphics, alongside generous amounts of RAM and storage for handling heavy duty computing tasks anywhere.

The a-XP appears to be a micro-ATX case with a handle on top that's bolted to the back of a chunky laptop. While this beast won't be winning any beauty contests, it'll likely save lots of time for workers at on-site jobs where immense computing power is the need of the hour.

Mediaworkstations.net, the company behind this portable workstation, is targeting it at creative and technical professionals in need of a powerful, mobile PC that can adequately handle demanding routines involving media production, visual effects, VR/AR, scientific research, and CAD applications.

The a-XP's basic configuration comes in at nearly $8,000, which includes AMD's 24-core 3960X, Nvidia's RTX 2060 Super Blower Edition, 32GB of RAM and a 250GB Samsung 970 EVO Plus SSD. Fork over another $1,600 to get the 32-core 3970X or $3,600 to equip the monstrous 64-core 128-thread 3990X.

Being a PC, there's a myriad of configurable hardware options available, including GPUs from Nvidia's GeForce/Titan/Quadro/Tesla series and storage options from Samsung, Intel, Micron, and WD. Buyers can also choose from other peripherals like a RAID controller card, gigabit network adapter, or expand PCIe-based storage with Intel's superfast Optane memory.

A fully loaded configuration of the portable a-XP comes with an AMD 3990X, Nvidia's 32GB Tesla V100 GPU, 64GB RAM, 4TB SSD, and 28TB of SATA storage. Given all this powerful hardware, the a-XP doesn't feature a battery on-board, though a CacheVault flash-based backup and multiple UPS options are available for dealing with power outages, pushing the a-XP's price well above $30,000 once all options have been maxed out.

Although it features a mechanical keyboard, the rugged-looking touchpad on this machine seems a tad smaller than most modern laptops, which is why Mediaworkstations has multiple keyboard/mice combos on offer from Logitech and Microsoft, in addition to a couple of desktop speakers for delivering ample sound in the outdoors.

The a-XP portable workstation is compatible with 64-bit versions of Linux and Windows 10. It weighs between 10-13kgs (23-30 lbs) depending on configuration, measures 13.63" x 16.51" x 7.26", and comes with a free "3 Year Depot Warranty."

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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 3,300   +3,116
There is a market for everything, and I'm sure someone will buy this - most likely for work in the field.

But would it not be easier to buy a powerful laptop?

When I travel, I bring a Core i9 laptop with a 2080 and an HDMI cable, just in case I want to mirror or extend to a foreign LCD TV - which tend to be about 40" to 50" in Southeast Asian condos/hotels.

This^ is something I'd probably only consider if I was doing serious design work abroad or in remote locations, but even then, most high-end laptops don't cost this much.
 

Thanthan

Posts: 47   +96
There is a market for everything, and I'm sure someone will buy this - most likely for work in the field.

But would it not be easier to buy a powerful laptop?

When I travel, I bring a Core i9 laptop with a 2080 and an HDMI cable, just in case I want to mirror or extend to a foreign LCD TV - which tend to be about 40" to 50" in Southeast Asian condos/hotels.

This^ is something I'd probably only consider if I was doing serious design work abroad or in remote locations, but even then, most high-end laptops don't cost this much.
Its probably for on location film work or similar. In Any case its meant for applications that simply wont run on a notebook at a level that makes sense. There are a LOT of those, No matter the notebook.
 

Mister_K

Posts: 1,946   +627
There is a market for everything, and I'm sure someone will buy this - most likely for work in the field.

But would it not be easier to buy a powerful laptop?

When I travel, I bring a Core i9 laptop with a 2080 and an HDMI cable, just in case I want to mirror or extend to a foreign LCD TV - which tend to be about 40" to 50" in Southeast Asian condos/hotels.

This^ is something I'd probably only consider if I was doing serious design work abroad or in remote locations, but even then, most high-end laptops don't cost this much.
or just get a van and sort a full tower PC. I can see this being useful for film production but still, you will have dedicated media machine or as you said, a powerful laptop.
 

arrowflash

Posts: 171   +148
I find the concept of luggable PCs very interesting and would like to see it making a comeback, however this one looks like a poorly designed effort and too expensive. Instead of tilting the case (which can be dangerous), the case should be able to stand vertically with the ability to tilt only the screen in an upwards angle (that's how all luggable PCs with side-mounted LCD screens used to work in the 1980s). This one seems to be just a standard case with a screen bolted on its side, and based on the rear screenshot the PSU doesn't seem to be adequate for a high-end machine (the manufacturer's site lists very detailed machine specs except there's no mention of the power supply, by the way...).

With current year technology and engineering, a properly designed luggable PC should be very interesting. We could even add rechargeable batteries.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 7,379   +5,805
I had a Compaq "luggable" back in the late 80's. It was a horse to lug around but it did the job even though it had a tiny little screen. End up selling it to a friend that was a plumber so he could make & print out quotes right out of his truck. He told me it was worth it's weight in gold because he was the only contractor that could react so fast and it got him a ton of business .....
 

quadibloc

Posts: 198   +108
Are there any Threadripper-based laptops to compete with this? I didn't think so, although since it looks like a desktop computer rather than a computer designed to be used as a lunchbox luggable, I am concerned with whether or not it will work properly as well. The screen seems to be mounted on the bottom of the case, so convection will move heat the wrong way (which, of course, just means the fans have to work slightly harder).
 
I find the concept of luggable PCs very interesting and would like to see it making a comeback, however this one looks like a poorly designed effort and too expensive. Instead of tilting the case (which can be dangerous), the case should be able to stand vertically with the ability to tilt only the screen in an upwards angle (that's how all luggable PCs with side-mounted LCD screens used to work in the 1980s). This one seems to be just a standard case with a screen bolted on its side, and based on the rear screenshot the PSU doesn't seem to be adequate for a high-end machine (the manufacturer's site lists very detailed machine specs except there's no mention of the power supply, by the way...).

With current year technology and engineering, a properly designed luggable PC should be very interesting. We could even add rechargeable batteries.
The battery needed to power multiple GPUs & a powerful desktop CPU for good runtime would at least double the size & weight of the machine. We would also need some lockable wheels (maybe tractor-style for off-road that could slide up snug) & a pull-out handle moved to the side to make it usable for people unable to lift weight that manual laborers do rather than office-types.