Microsoft Copilot is showing ads in Windows 11 now, too

Alfonso Maruccia

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Facepalm: Microsoft plans to introduce Copilot to the whole Windows world with the next major Windows 11 update. The AI-based service will introduce several new, advanced features to the operating system, but some of those will likely bring new anxiety issues to privacy-conscious users.

Microsoft Copilot is the new AI service integrated into Windows 11 23H2. The feature is designed to become the new digital assistant for Windows users after Cortana's demise. It is a proper harbinger of the wonders of this new overhyped AI era.

Microsoft described Copilot as the "everyday AI companion" of Windows users--a service that will unify all the AI capabilities previously introduced by the company on the familiar Windows desktop. Users can query Copilot thanks to a new taskbar icon and through a dedicated sidebar. The assistant can even turn some operating system features on or off. A new keyboard shortcut (Win+C) triggers the AI service.

However, Martin Brinkmann of gHacks notes that the Windows-related stuff in Copilot requires a constant internet connection. As with most current AI systems, task processing takes a lot of horsepower. So, to turn on dark mode, for example, this advanced AI companion must send the query to a Microsoft server for processing before it can change any local settings.

It gets worse. Users who installed the preview Windows 11 23H2 upgrade are already experiencing unwanted advertisements during Copilot interactions. Asking the AI assistant for gaming laptops shows related ads after the AI-generated suggestions.

As an internet-based feature, there is currently no known way to disable advertising on Copilot. Users can still disable the AI companion with a registry hack or through the Group Policy Editor. Microsoft could also remove this annoying "feature" with a future Windows 11 update or patch but don't hold your breath.

Microsoft has continued shoving more unrequested advertising into Windows 10/11 features and apps. However, most of these ads are related to other Microsoft services and products. This new AI craze provides interesting (and problematic) new ways to increase Redmond's advertising revenue through the Windows desktop.

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"Asking the AI assistant for gaming laptops shows related ads after the AI-generated suggestions"

What did they expect to happen when they asked such a question?

could also remove this annoying "feature" with a future Windows 11 update or patch but don't hold your breath.

22-H2 never installed for me, there's no hope for a '23 version. Really not liking anything from Microsoft anymore.
 
A lot of software producers seem to think that it's ok to shove advertisements down your throat, even after you pay for a license. Even makers of professional software like TeamViewer do that. It's a sad evolution.

What Microsoft is concerned: of I didn't need Windows for some applications, I would have switched to Linux some time ago already.
 
Chill down, people. The ads are obviously there to "pay" for the generative AI services rendered, which are quite computationally, storage, and memory intensive tasks. Would you rather want to have access to these (generative) services only through a subscription, or would you like to be redirected to a webpage (which would show the ads) to have to use these?

Then again, most millenials get upset about everything, because they think they should receive everything for free, while themselves getting a large salary for their own work, of course.
 
Thank god I run Mint.....
And that's great for some man. But I need myself and my staff at peak productivity.

"Would you rather want to have access to these (generative) services only through a subscription, or would you like to be redirected to a webpage (which would show the ads) to have to use these?"

Or option 3, Not have them at all.
Plenty of b**** squeals about ad placement, and never the open realization or acknowledgement that they got the newest Windows for free.

So. Option 4 for me, Mark. I will just consider it a small price to pay for getting free updates to the operating system. But then, I'm not an ungrateful little whiner.
 
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And that's great for some man. But I need myself and my staff at peak productivity.

Just out of curiosity, how OS affects your productivity? I'm using both Windows and Linux as dev / some management, and I haven't really found any part of my tasks where one is significantly better than the other. Actually, I improved my process thanks to the Linux in many places.
 
Just out of curiosity, how OS affects your productivity? I'm using both Windows and Linux as dev / some management, and I haven't really found any part of my tasks where one is significantly better than the other. Actually, I improved my process thanks to the Linux in many places.
We use AutoCAD and Fusion 360. Not those, or any of our other programs (We use 3DS Max, for example, for modeling and some animating) are available for Linux.
Also, CAD programs made for Linux are just not viable for the kind of work we do.
Honestly, most just amount to an early step before learning the serious stuff.
 
Also, CAD programs made for Linux are just not viable for the kind of work we do.
Honestly, most just amount to an early step before learning the serious stuff.
I'm calling BS, I know a Machineshop that moved to Linux because the downtime from windows updates was costing them money and clients. It took a little setting and adding dependencies to the software to add features, but it's not like it was anymore difficult than you expected when setting up software in the mid 2000s.

It was one thing when windows just worked and you could pay for software that runs on windows that just worked, but that isn't the case anymore. I'd rather just setup Linux once and not worry about it then have a windows update that breaks something and I have to start rolling back updates to gain functionality again.

Linux and the software that comes with it is no more difficult to use than XP was. People forget that XP actually took some work to, well, get working. You also had to be a little tech savvy to use it properly. That's one reason that windows 7 was loved so much, it took the work out of maintaining your machine.
 
We use AutoCAD and Fusion 360. Not those, or any of our other programs (We use 3DS Max, for example, for modeling and some animating) are available for Linux.
Also, CAD programs made for Linux are just not viable for the kind of work we do.
Honestly, most just amount to an early step before learning the serious stuff.

Is it OS fault that some of the software is not available, on Linux, or developer?
And here we are while Autodesk is selling Linux Maya version :) ( IIRC 3dsMax uses Qt lib for ui now also)
 
We use AutoCAD and Fusion 360. Not those, or any of our other programs (We use 3DS Max, for example, for modeling and some animating) are available for Linux.
Also, CAD programs made for Linux are just not viable for the kind of work we do.
Honestly, most just amount to an early step before learning the serious stuff.
Yes, this is one of the use cases which can't be reliably transferred, fully agree. I thought Catia have Linux version, but I think I just remember times when it was working on PPC. It's a pity, I do hope we will see more big CAD tools moving to Linux at some point. This weird approach to adds and actual control in the Windows might actually be something to make decision makers spend little bit more resources on that idea;)
 
Is it OS fault that some of the software is not available, on Linux, or developer?
And here we are while Autodesk is selling Linux Maya version :) ( IIRC 3dsMax uses Qt lib for ui now also)
Fault? Consumers. Too small perceived Linux market for additional code base, means extra developers with Linux knowledge, testers, release branch, bug maintenance, quality control to put a product for maybe 2% of PC users (even less in corporate area) who often will complain anyway 'because it is not FOSS' ;)
If consumers weren't supporting MS this badly, then developers would might have actual reason to address more OS's.
 
Just to show what a dumb f**k I can be, I initially thought the service was pronounced CopyLot..that's a bit strange I thought but whatever floats their boat. 🙄😜
 
I'm calling BS, I know a Machineshop that moved to Linux because the downtime from windows updates was costing them money and clients.
I'm not sure how expansive the program would have to be for a machine shop, but regardless, I should have mentioned that what I said was just my opinion. But I can't see being able to draw up a single story parking garage with the tools available for Linux :D.
It has been a few years though, so maybe it has gotten better.

Is it OS fault that some of the software is not available, on Linux, or developer?
Hell no, but it is a necessary consideration.
 
I'm not sure how expansive the program would have to be for a machine shop, but regardless, I should have mentioned that what I said was just my opinion.
Well they both had to design parts for clients and be compatible with any CAD files clients would send them. I do know that they had to simulate stress points in parts and stress points on the tools during the CNC process so they could create new tool paths before machining.
 
Chill down, people. The ads are obviously there to "pay" for the generative AI services rendered, which are quite computationally, storage, and memory intensive tasks. Would you rather want to have access to these (generative) services only through a subscription, or would you like to be redirected to a webpage (which would show the ads) to have to use these?

Then again, most millenials get upset about everything, because they think they should receive everything for free, while themselves getting a large salary for their own work, of course.

Nope, they are just greed based and privacy tracking crap from one of the richest companies in the world, plain and simple. Stop making excuses for corporate greed and the need shove our life full of garbage ads with literally every single digital product we used whether we paid for it or not. You think this new model was because Microsoft is benevolent? LOL. Nobody asked for this AI privacy invasion bulls**t running 24/7 on their computers. So, Option 3, didn't ask for it, don't want it, ever.
 
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