Microsoft is working on a 'sweeping visual rejuvenation' for Windows 10

Polycount

Posts: 2,758   +571
Staff member
In context: Windows 10's design is a bit of a mixed bag. In some areas, it shows off Microsoft's 'Fluent Design' philosophy quite well (albeit at the loss of some functionality), but in others, you'll still find interfaces, menus, and settings from the Windows 7 era. To address these inconsistencies, Microsoft is reportedly planning a "sweeping visual rejuvenation" of Windows 10.

This information came to light thanks to a recent job listing posted by Microsoft. The listing calls for a software engineer who can work alongside Microsoft's "key platform, Surface, and OEM partners" to deliver said "rejuvenation."

The ultimate goal of the refresh would be to signal to Microsoft's customers that "Windows is BACK" (emphasis theirs), and that Windows is the "best user OS experience for customers."

It's difficult to say how a visual overhaul might accomplish that task, especially because we have no idea what Microsoft means by "best user OS experience."

Does it mean a more simplified or streamlined user experience? As enthusiasts and power users ourselves, we'd hesitate to call that the "best" outcome, but the alternative also doesn't seem likely: making things more complex isn't really Microsoft's thing. Not lately, anyway.

Some reports say changes are coming to the Start menu and File Explorer (as well as a host of pre-installed Windows apps), but we'll just have to wait and see what the tech giant has up its sleeve.

For what it's worth, this job listing has already been altered to remove any mention of a "sweeping rejuvenation," so Microsoft may have changed its mind. Or maybe the company is simply kicking itself for leaking the news so blatantly.

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TomSEA

Posts: 3,318   +2,066
Well, you know MS is never going to let Windows 10 just sit as is. There will always be tweaks and reconfigurations seeing as it's the last version of Windows they said they'd release.

I don't begrudge them recruiting coders using "exciting" buzz words and phraseology. You'll see the same in any software development company recruitment ads.
 

Fearghast

Posts: 293   +191
IT administrators ... we finally have figured out how to fix M$ issue 5687!
M$ Let me introduce a new challenge with new update.

THX M$ for providing a lot of work for IT department, we would not like to see them bored or doing a real work ... like having time for other programs or hardware, do we?
 
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bviktor

Posts: 311   +570
Honestly I couldn't care less. And I'll never understand the Windows 8 outcry either. It's been like a decade or so, but we still have people whining about the Start menu. Seriously, how much time do you spend in the Start menu daily, 10 seconds, 20 maybe? Like 0.001% of your time? Why's that such an issue? Why is it the single most important issue? It's about as relevant to me as the looks of the BIOS settings. Who the hell cares, just get on with it.

I'm not using Windows, I'm using my APPS on Windows, Windows is just a tool to allow me to do that. It's literally just a task bar for organizing my open apps' icons lol. The rest of the issue is just people with too much free time on their hands, looking for things to get angry about.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 7,770   +6,401
If Microsoft wants Windows 10 to be vastly improved they need to do onw simple thing. Drop the glitz and pretty image and FOCUS ON FUNCTION. Anyone that lived through the early days of computing knows the value of having a system that was highly functional and could be worked on & modified by the end user. That's why the original apple had a lid on it. Woz wanted you to be able to easily get to the inside and play with the thing. It was all ruined the day Jobs pushed Woz out of the company, sealed the computers, and demanded you take it to a service center.
 
If they follow the market need, you're going to see more 'dummy down' principal applied, and you'll see things getting simpler so people that are not computer smart are able to use their devices. Telephones are a big design factor. I like things complex, but found out a long time ago that my desires were not common.
 

cliffordcooley

Posts: 12,586   +5,967
And I'll never understand the Windows 8 outcry either. It's been like a decade or so, but we still have people whining about the Start menu. Seriously, how much time do you spend in the Start menu daily, 10 seconds, 20 maybe?
How much time do you spend looking at your car instead of driving it? Care to explain why you would rather have a nice looking car?
 

BSim500

Posts: 734   +1,580
Honestly I couldn't care less. And I'll never understand the Windows 8 outcry either. It's been like a decade or so, but we still have people whining about the Start menu. Seriously, how much time do you spend in the Start menu daily, 10 seconds, 20 maybe? Like 0.001% of your time? Why's that such an issue? Why is it the single most important issue? It's about as relevant to me as the looks of the BIOS settings. Who the hell cares, just get on with it. I'm not using Windows, I'm using my APPS on Windows
^ Ironically, that right there is half the dumbing down problem. I don't use "APPS" on a desktop PC. I use applications. ;) To answer your question properly though, "who cares" is many people who understand and want a smooth UX design. Humans have always trended towards hierarchical organisation. That's why the address book on your phone is A-Z, it's why games, movies & music are organized into genres instead of all dumped in one random pile on the floor. Why your own SSD / HDD doesn't have 1 milion files in just 1 folder, etc. The Start Menu ability to split off into sub-menu's (and sub-menu's of sub-menu's) nailed that perfectly back in '95 which is why it's so popular and has "endured" so long.

No-one ever liked MS's "flat" reinvention BS, and the whole thing is really reminiscent of the observation that open-source software is often weaker at the start / middle due to lack of focus but strong at the end (once software peaks, it's 'allowed' to stay there) whilst closed-source is often the opposite (more focussed at the start / middle but then has to resort to desperate Changemaster (tm) gimmicks to appear to be seen to be "working" on something and ends up creating new versions more for Stockholders than actual users. And there's no question that both Windows & Office are well past their peak on your "But I just want to get work done without the BS" curve...
 
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Biostud

Posts: 26   +11
After cleaning up the start menu I've started to really like it.

First remove everything that you don't use, then organize the app's you actually use.
 
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captaincranky

Posts: 16,306   +5,096
Hey, I have a great idea for a new GUI, I call it, "Aero". But since I can't code in visual C++, I guess it's no job for me :(
 

Ludak021

Posts: 333   +233
After cleaning up the start menu I've started to really like it.

First remove everything that you don't use, then organize the app's you actually use.
they have their shortcuts on desktop, hence, they are easier to access rather than going to "start menu". That's why I personally don't like "new" start menu. Sure, since it's there, I've put a box there showing (inaccurate as always) weather. and that's about it. The success of Nokia windows phones shows how good their UX is. The whole idea died, and got shut down completely recently. They are moving to android. I can't imagine why...
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,306   +5,096
I'm still onto 7. 10 is just way to slow for me despite fast startup
You probably have an SSD on C:/. That explains the "fast startup", ever so much more than Windows 10.

We've had a litany of claims about "fast boot times with Windows 10", ever since its release.

Well, the machine someone just built to install 10, likely has a CPU damned near twice as fast as the one it replaced, along with near twice faster RAM, and an SSD. So why does Windows 10 seem to get all the credit?
 
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OortCloud

Posts: 500   +333
Pro tip, unify the legacy control panel and settings applet and your "sweeping visual rejuvenation" will be complete.
I agree - the control panel stuff is all over the place.
Pro tip 2: When combining them please make ALL the options available on the new one that we used to have - even if they are behind an 'advanced' button click, don't just remove required functionality. A simple example... The 'new' battery settings only allow basic changes, yet if I do a search I can still find and run the old battery control panel applet or I click advanced it goes there too - they knew they hadn't done it properly so left the old control panel app floating around - there are numerous examples of this - what a mess!

So basically all we want is a Search that works and a nice settings UI that has all options available on it... How hard can that be???? (Yes I know there are a lot of settings dialogs littered throughout windows and am being slightly flippant but there are a lot of devs in MS and Windows is quite an important part of the company portfolio isn't it???? - so do it properly!!!)
 
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Adhmuz

Posts: 2,076   +862
Microsoft can do as they wish with the start menu, I stopped caring just as long as they don't find a way to block Classic Start. Every system I install Windows 10 on that's the very first thing I install and load up my custom XML file with my configuration the way I want it to look.

I've learned to accept Microsoft will never go back to what made sense and worked best, they're far too committed. So simply put if you don't like it, change it, Windows is still Windows after all, make it what you want, and by all means voice your opinion. Hoping one day someone over there will listen and at least give some kind of option built in to the OS that allows you to choose.
 
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The best fix for Windows 10 is to let the user chose which visual experience they want with a simple single selection: Windows XP, Windows 7, or one of the newer ones. Give me the simplicity of Windows 7 and I will be happy. I fail to understand why Microsoft didn't do this years ago.
 
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Stiqy

Posts: 73   +69
Microsoft should properly disassociate function from UX and thus allow anyone to *easily* provide alternative interfaces. Classic Shell is always the first thing I install to fix the start menu. And things like Rainmeter exist to modify lots of other things, but these solutions have to be layered on top of or wedged into Windows almost by force. If Microsoft just said "here is the default UX, but also, here is everything you need to build your own interface that hooks into the functionality", then every user and use case could build/create exactly what they want. It could be as simple or as complex as they desire.
 

havok585

Posts: 249   +90
Honestly I couldn't care less. And I'll never understand the Windows 8 outcry either. It's been like a decade or so, but we still have people whining about the Start menu. Seriously, how much time do you spend in the Start menu daily, 10 seconds, 20 maybe? Like 0.001% of your time? Why's that such an issue? Why is it the single most important issue? It's about as relevant to me as the looks of the BIOS settings. Who the hell cares, just get on with it.

I'm not using Windows, I'm using my APPS on Windows, Windows is just a tool to allow me to do that. It's literally just a task bar for organizing my open apps' icons lol. The rest of the issue is just people with too much free time on their hands, looking for things to get angry about.
your whole rant is irrelevant, most people care, many stayed on w7 because of the stupid design decision M$ did with 8 and 10..
 
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Michiel

Posts: 55   +33
I for one really like the Windows 10 look. It's mostly the configuration and settings stuff that's still rather all over the place. So if they can unify that without losing functionality - great. I wish we could get nice big icons in the start menu (and option to turn labels on and off). I use iconifier for this now so it's no biggie, but often the icons reset themselves when apps are updated.
Some more configurability and options for the left hand pane in the explorer would be good too. But the overall look is fine by me.