Microsoft's upcoming Windows 10X might appear on more than just foldables

mongeese

TS Maniac
Staff member

Microsoft’s intentions regarding 10X’s user interface were almost entirely revealed by a now-absent webpage, first mentioned to a little blue bird by a prowling feline. The changes are sweeping for the typically static Windows, but there’s nothing revolutionary: call it ChromeOS for Windows.

The Start Menu, now called the ‘Launcher’ in very Android-y fashion, is helmed by a new Search feature that is “seamlessly integrated with web results, available apps and specific files on your device.” It supports voice, keyboard, and touch and is based on everyone’s favorite search engine, Bing. Sitting just below is a semi-permanent app grid, that’s chosen by the user but can shift slightly based on use. Websites can be installed as apps from Edge. Expanding it reveals all the device’s apps, and they can be uninstalled from there.

Beneath that is a “recommended” section, focused on content that is “dynamically updated based on your most frequently and recently used apps, files, and websites.” Live tiles, and the app list as we know it is entirely gone. As a bonus, so is Cortana.

At the bottom of a new Windows 10X interface you’ll find a revamped Taskbar, which might have a mysterious new File Explorer. “For both clamshells and foldables, the taskbar will be the same base model with a series of ‘levers’ which can be pulled to create some alternatives in the model.” Levers include alignment, number of recents, the order of recents, and a few stylistic choices.

On the right will be an Action Center, that seems to replace both the notification center and quick settings. Taking another cue from Android, there’s a normal notifications list and some configurable quick settings behind a swipe. Interestingly there’s also a reference to cellular settings, which might suggest the Neo has a SIM slot.

The documents show there’s plenty still undecided about Windows 10X – we’re commenting on design abstracts here, so don’t think anything is a guarantee. In fact, if these documents are as recent as they suggest, then Microsoft doesn’t even have a single line of code ready for Windows 10X. That makes this the perfect opportunity to give some feedback to Microsoft so they can implement it for the Surface Neo’s release next year. If you have some ideas, be vocal.

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p51d007

TS Evangelist
I know MS needs to "grow" or whatever the marketing term is, but can't we just have a reliable OS, without all the "glamour and glitz"? Windows 7 was very stable & reliable.
Then comes along windows 8, 8.1 & 10. Personally, I didn't have "that" much of an issue with 8, 8.1 & 10, other than trying to undo all the GUI crap that gets in the way. As long as the program "classic start" continues to run on Win 10, I'll just stick with it. Until such time as Adobe Photoshop/Lightroom will install and run on Linux, I'm kind of tied to the dos/windows environment.
 
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treetops

TS Evangelist
It's like why did you make the back button so so small. Even Internet Explorer got that right. You can't drag stuff from your search results to the desktop or create a shortcut.... They named programs apps to try and be trendy. Used the term This PC to imitate the long dead MySpace. At least on Android you can uninstall the default browser. I wish Sony would release a gaming OS akin to the PS4 for PC? Or Nintendo?
 

m4a4

TS Evangelist
I wish Sony would release a gaming OS akin to the PS4 for PC? Or Nintendo?
The problem with that is that Windows holds the open standard for PC gaming for a few good reasons:
1) It supports almost every hardware configuration (which isn't an easy thing to do).
2) It supports game launchers of any kind (no walled garden).
3) At the end of the day, it's still pretty easy to use and customize.

There's just not really any reason to challenge Windows PC OS for gaming in any practical sense right now. It's easier to focus on their walled garden console OS's (or try for convenience with streaming).
 

treetops

TS Evangelist
The problem with that is that Windows holds the open standard for PC gaming for a few good reasons:
1) It supports almost every hardware configuration (which isn't an easy thing to do).
2) It supports game launchers of any kind (no walled garden).
3) At the end of the day, it's still pretty easy to use and customize.

There's just not really any reason to challenge Windows PC OS for gaming in any practical sense right now. It's easier to focus on their walled garden console OS's (or try for convenience with streaming).
I understand your points and kinda just thought it goes without saying but it does need to be said. I want to say the cliche lack of competition etc. However, one main thing is that console OS's are light weight, perhaps because of the points you made. Competition aside, it's just disheartening that you have no other option. People say things like oh were trying with linux and or it can't be done. But they completely ignore the fact consoles are doing it. Don't take this as throwing shade at any of the amazing people who give us linux for free. It just feels like I'm stuck on IE, with no other options. My main goal was to provoke the thought that it's plausible. And Windows seems to heavily rely on the fact we have no other options in many aspects. Think if we had a gaming leap on the OS side like we've had going from IE to whatever your likely using now.

4Th problem game devs will have to support the new OS?
 

m4a4

TS Evangelist
I understand your points and kinda just thought it goes without saying but it does need to be said. I want to say the cliche lack of competition etc. However, one main thing is that console OS's are light weight, perhaps because of the points you made. Competition aside, it's just disheartening that you have no other option. People say things like oh were trying with linux and or it can't be done. But they completely ignore the fact consoles are doing it. Don't take this as throwing shade at any of the amazing people who give us linux for free. It just feels like I'm stuck on IE, with no other options. My main goal was to provoke the thought that it's plausible. And Windows seems to heavily rely on the fact we have no other options in many aspects. Think if we had a gaming leap on the OS side like we've had going from IE to whatever your likely using now.

4Th problem game devs will have to support the new OS?
Beyond the initial buying of Windows 10, there's not much competition that can be had (or needed IMO) for a PC gaming OS. MS doesn't further profit from the amount of games being played on a W10 installation.

Steam's already tried doing something separate from W10, but it just wasn't popular enough because it didn't do "everything" like W10 does. It was just easier to also play off of Windows.
Then Linux isn't backed by a billion dollar corporation, so they can't properly compete. They would have the best chance (because they can do "everything"), but I don't even know if Linux users would want a mainstream, big-corporation-backed branch. And there's no telling if it will even be mainstream enough for the average user.
Mac isn't really worth considering because they're a walled garden (and don't really care enough about gaming).

And remember, consoles rely on 2 things: convenience, and a set hardware (which helps them be cheap and physically/digitally lightweight). The tradeoff being that they're a closed platform and aren't as convenient for other things.

Basically, unless the PC OS can do almost everything Windows 10 can do (on top of gaming), it's not even worth it. As much as people hate on it, W10 is convenient and open enough that another do-everything OS won't capture much market without a bigger selling point than "M$ is bad". And a closed platform won't do much.
Though, if MS starts taking things for granted and tries to close their open platform, I'd certainly welcome competition that restores that open platform.

Ps. These days adding support for a new platform is relatively easy to do for game engines. It's more of a "is the OS designed to be engine-friendly?" or "does the SDK from the platform work?".
 
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arrowflash

TS Booster
Just hope they don't try to push this mobile touchscreen crap in the desktop OS, and if they do make it optional. Windows 8 start screen and the Windows 10 "start menu" (which is just the Windows 8 start screen in a vertical list format) are already awful enough.

By the way, strange that the usual resident MS astroturfers haven't showed up yet...
 

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