Newly disclosed Xbox Easter egg has remained hidden for nearly 20 years

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,286   +132
Staff member
In brief: Microsoft’s first home game console, the Xbox, launched way back in November of 2001. More than 24 million units were sold worldwide before Microsoft officially discontinued the system in 2006 to focus on its successor, the Xbox 360. Nearly 20 years later, the console is still hiding secrets that gamers somehow never managed to stumble across.

Kotaku was recently contacted by an anonymous source that worked on the original Xbox. The person shared an Easter egg that, to the best of their knowledge, has remained undiscovered for almost 20 years.

It’s nothing groundbreaking, mind you, and the leaker even said they didn’t expect it to be found unless the source code leaked or someone reverse-engineered the Dashboard, but it’s still pretty remarkable that none of that has happened yet.

To activate the egg, fire up an original Xbox follow these steps:

  • Go into “Music” and insert an audio CD. (A short album will take less time.)
  • From the Audio CD screen choose “Copy,” “Copy” again, then “New Soundtrack.”
  • Delete the default soundtrack title and replace it with (no quotes) “Timmyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy!” (That’s the letter “y” 26 times. No need to count; just fill the entire field and replace the last one with a “!”.)
  • Sit a spell. Enjoy the sounds of the hard drive stealing the disc’s essence.
  • When ripping completes, back out to the main menu.
  • Choose “Settings” and then “System Info.”
  • You should now see a new screen listing members of the “Xbox Dashboard Team.”

The trick replaces the standard contents of the “System Info” screen with a new listing that shows the names of the Xbox Dashboard team. Like I said, it’s not groundbreaking, but neat nevertheless.

Kotaku further confirmed that this “is not the final secret hidden within the original Xbox” that Seamus Blackley referenced in 2017.

The publication reached out to Blackley for clarification, who said the egg he has in mind involves the Xbox’s boot animation. When asked if controller inputs were needed to trigger it, he said “Nope, it doesn’t. But I’m tempted to say it does. But no it doesn’t really. At all. For sure. I’m pretty sure at least.”

Image credit Sam Bianchini

Permalink to story.

 

DrSuess

Posts: 108   +80
I have mix feelings about Easter eggs. I think they are fun but if there are no hints to their existence then it's dumb.
The fun is in the randomness of discovering them. Most Easter Eggs are found by accident. I'm not going to waste my time looking for them because in the grand scheme of things they are meaningless, but if I find one by accident I will just enjoy the experience.
 

amghwk

Posts: 1,055   +969
What amazes me is how the guy found it out. What made him do the sequence that he did? I mean entering 'y' 26 times followed by a '!' and all the other things needed to be done to elicit the Easter egg....baffling.
 

Vanderlinde

Posts: 33   +17
What amazes me is how the guy found it out. What made him do the sequence that he did? I mean entering 'y' 26 times followed by a '!' and all the other things needed to be done to elicit the Easter egg....baffling.

Proberly by traces in code or something. You dont wake up one day and start doing whats done in that video.
 

SixTymes

Posts: 141   +93
Ha! “Timmyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy!” that's pretty cool and funny at the same time. odd no one has found it, people must have gotten lazier since 2001. hardly anyone bothers to tinker, and schools are too busy teaching kids how to hate each other rather than learn electronics or how to fix and create things.
 

Zor Ven

Posts: 19   +21
What amazes me is how the guy found it out. What made him do the sequence that he did? I mean entering 'y' 26 times followed by a '!' and all the other things needed to be done to elicit the Easter egg....baffling.

"Kotaku was recently contacted by an anonymous source that worked on the original Xbox."
 

Q Wales

Posts: 27   +2
The guy didn't find it he wrote it or at least knew the guys who did "recently contacted by an anonymous source that worked on the original Xbox" - ah just noticed same comment above

It's just a bit of fun for programmers who for the most part spend a lot of time with boring code, so don't knock it. Many professions do this sort of thing. Carpenters and stone workers hide hidden comments and signatures. I worked on an old lift in a museum once and there was a load of "art work" in there.