Samsung's new entry-level 5G phone has a 6,000mAh battery, offers 4 years of OS updates

DragonSlayer101

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In context: Samsung's S-series flagships get a lot of press, but the company is also known to launch a large number of entry-level and mid-range handsets at varying price points. This week, the South Korean chaebol added one more device to its lower-mid-range lineup with hardware and features that belie its super-affordable price tag.

Dubbed the Galaxy F15 5G, the latest smartphone in Samsung's portfolio features a 6.5-inch full-HD+ (2,340 x 1080 pixel resolution) Super AMOLED display with 90Hz refresh rate. It is powered by the MediaTek Dimensity 6100+ chipset, which includes an octa-core CPU and the Mali-G57 MP2 GPU. Samsung is offering the device with either 4GB or 6GB of RAM, with both variants rocking 128GB of built-in storage that can be expanded by up to 1TB with a microSD card.

For photography, the Galaxy F15 packs a triple camera setup at the rear, comprising a 50MP primary sensor, a 5MP secondary shooter, and a 2MP tertiary snapper. On the front, it has a 13MP camera housed within a teardrop notch for selfies and video chat. The device sports a hefty 6,000mAh battery that Samsung claims can deliver up to two days of battery life and up to 25 hours of video playback on a single charge.

Connectivity options on the Galaxy F15 include 5G, Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 5.3, GPS, a 3.5mm headphone socket, and a USB Type-C port. Onboard sensors include an accelerometer, gyroscope, geomagnetic sensor, ambient light sensor, virtual proximity sensor, and a fingerprint scanner. The handset measures 160.1x76.8x8.4mm and weighs 217 grams.

The best part about the Galaxy F15, however, is its software. It not only runs Android 14-based One UI 5, but Samsung is also promising 4 years of OS updates and 5 years of security updates for its newest smartphone. That's impressive even for high-end phones and almost unheard of for an entry-level device starting at just rupees 12,999 (around $156) in India.

That brings us to our final note about the Galaxy F15. Samsung's F-series devices are typically exclusive to India, and there's no reason to believe that things would be any different with the F15. It's currently only launched in India, with no word on whether it will ever be available globally. So if you are on the lookout for an affordable Android, you might have to look elsewhere because the F15 is unlikely to hit store shelves in the US.

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I dont know why every OEM is so scared of bringing bigger batteries to the west. Why cant we have 6-7000 mah phones?
 
I dont know why every OEM is so scared of bringing bigger batteries to the west. Why cant we have 6-7000 mah phones?
My s21+ has a 5000mah battery and that lasts me about 3 days, but I keep my phone in power saver mode because I don't do anything but argue with you guys on it and make phone calls.
 
My s21+ has a 5000mah battery and that lasts me about 3 days, but I keep my phone in power saver mode because I don't do anything but argue with you guys on it and make phone calls.
Yeah I know, my motos have had 5000mah since 2016. But more is more er. Even if you dont have an outward use case for that much capacity, it means you have to recharge that much less over time, which means longer lifespans for phone batteries.

I seem to reliably get a year of use for every 1000 mah these days. I'd take a 7000 mah in a heatbeat. My note 4 back in the day had a 10000 mah zerolemon and that was frankly AMAZING back in the day.
 
Yeah I know, my motos have had 5000mah since 2016. But more is more er. Even if you dont have an outward use case for that much capacity, it means you have to recharge that much less over time, which means longer lifespans for phone batteries.

I seem to reliably get a year of use for every 1000 mah these days. I'd take a 7000 mah in a heatbeat. My note 4 back in the day had a 10000 mah zerolemon and that was frankly AMAZING back in the day.
I usually break my phones before the battery needs replaced.
 
You would think that with as many people that get off the beaten trail and would depend upon their phone in case of emergency there would be a huge demand for greater battery life .... in fact I would expect some company to make that a MAJOR point in advertising their phone .....
 
I bought from India the Galaxy M51 in 2020 and it ended up being an excellent phone that I still use currently....in fact almost 4 years later my M51 still sports better specs than this upcoming new one with 7000 mah battery.
 
I'm starting to lean towards getting a new phone soon. S8 is still going, but the battery is certainly showing it's age - pushing 6.5 years on it. Acquired it in October of 2017 and looks like I spent around $600 on it because it was on sale for $150 off the original cost.

Aside from the crappy software they call Bixby (thankfully there are a couple of ways to turn this crap off), the S8 has been a great phone.

My s21+ has a 5000mah battery and that lasts me about 3 days, but I keep my phone in power saver mode because I don't do anything but argue with you guys on it and make phone calls.

Is Bixby still a thing on the newer models? I really do hate the software. It's been pretty much the main reason I've been avoiding moving to a new Samsung phone (aside from the fact that my current one still works).
 
Is Bixby still a thing on the newer models? I really do hate the software. It's been pretty much the main reason I've been avoiding moving to a new Samsung phone (aside from the fact that my current one still works).
I think it is but I think I turned if off years ago. like insaid, all I do is read a few websites and make calls
 
I think it is but I think I turned if off years ago. like insaid, all I do is read a few websites and make calls
I know on the S8/9/10 models they made it really hard to turn it off. I haven't followed up on the newer models in the past few years so I wasn't sure.
 
Yeah I know, my motos have had 5000mah since 2016. But more is more er. Even if you dont have an outward use case for that much capacity, it means you have to recharge that much less over time, which means longer lifespans for phone batteries.

I seem to reliably get a year of use for every 1000 mah these days. I'd take a 7000 mah in a heatbeat. My note 4 back in the day had a 10000 mah zerolemon and that was frankly AMAZING back in the day.

Still like the "hello moto" ring tone - good basic phones at the time done dirt cheap
 
The M, A and F series are all the same phones, the A15 5g has been available here in the States for almost two months and it's the same phone spec wise as the F15 5g in the article. Tracfone and all the other budget MVNO's already sell it so it's really easy to get your hands on the phone, great research on the article.
 
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