Samsung's next Odyssey G9 monitor listed with 2,000 nits brightness, Mini LED tech

midian182

Posts: 6,803   +61
Staff member
Something to look forward to: Samsung’s Odyssey G9 is a 49-inch behemoth that we love, and it looks like the upgraded model will be even better. According to a new listing, the next Odyssey will be the first gaming monitor to support DisplayHDR 2000, which, at 2,000 nits, would make it the brightest available today.

We gave the Odyssey G9 a score of 90 in December, praising its 5120 x 1440 resolution, 240 Hz refresh rate, and good color performance for a VA panel. Samsung recently said the next version would be another tech product to use a Quantum Mini LED display. The OLED-like tech is becoming more popular in TVs, and is expected to feature in Apple’s next iPad Pro—and rumored to be causing production problems.

What Samsung didn’t mention, however, is that the monitor could be the brightest ever to hit the market. Chinese website Taobao (via VideoCardz) has it listed with VESA DisplayHDR 2000 certification. The current Odyssey is an already bright 1,000 nits, enough to support the HDR10 Standard, and its successor could double that number.

That level of brightness should make HDR content sparkle and let users play in even the brightest of rooms without worrying about glare. And while that 2,000 nits spec hasn’t been officially confirmed, rumors that the monitor would be DisplayHDR 2000 certified have been around for a while.

Elsewhere, the new Odyssey shares many of its predecessor’s features: 49-inch VA panel, 1000R curvature, 240 Hz refresh rate, a 1 ms response time, 5,120 x 1,440 resolution, 10-bit color depth, 95% DCI-P3 color coverage, and support for G-Sync and Freesync Pro. Another improvement in this model is its 2,048 local dimming zones, a feature commonly found in high-end TVs.

All this tech doesn’t come cheap, naturally. The current Odyssey G9 has an MSRP of $1,700, which is about the price of a beefy PC—in normal times, anyway. The upgraded version is listed at 29,999 RMB, which is about $4,600, though that could be a placeholder. It’s set to launch in Asia this June. No word on when the monitor will arrive in other regions.

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Tom Yum

Posts: 97   +222
2000 nits....

eye.jpg
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 332   +268
This is an inbetween product - so not infinite black - but extremely good for a monitor . Good HDR does not have to hit 2000 nits .- Yes nits in real life go extremely high - but we have iris in our pupils for a reason .
Hopefully has a night setting - installing bias lighting , back lighting - can greatly reduce eye strain on monitors and tvs in dark rooms - plus can increase perceived contrast and hide blooming etc . At least have some lighting in your gaming room - apparently at least 10% of screens output - not sure about that figure - but it is one tossed about
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
MiniLED? What is this? A dumpster for old TV tech?
LED screens are really LCD screens using LEDs for backlighting. Them being MiniLED allows for more backlighting zones for better local dimming and HDR accuracy. OLED panels don't have this problem because they can just turn off a particular pixel to achieve a true black. The problem OLEDs have is they don't have good HDR in comparison to LCD/LEDs due to burn in, their peak nit is usually @540 nits. The brighter the pixel the higher the risk of burn in on an OLED. One of the ways they are improving on OLED technology is finding ways to keep the display cooler. VA panels often used in LDC/LED displays don't have burn in issues allowing them to get much more brighter. I highly recommend watching videos from HDTVTest on YouTube, he breaks it all down quite well.
 

OptimumSlinky

Posts: 267   +502
I don't understand the nits war.

My Sony X900H TV is "only" 800 nits for HDR content, and I still had to turn the brightness down to around 15% to make content watchable at night.

HDR done right is fantastic, but I feel like a lot content creators and monitor makers are taking the VIVID setting approach.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
I don't understand the nits war.

My Sony X900H TV is "only" 800 nits for HDR content, and I still had to turn the brightness down to around 15% to make content watchable at night.

HDR done right is fantastic, but I feel like a lot content creators and monitor makers are taking the VIVID setting approach.
I also have the same TV, it is plenty bright for most situations, especially low light viewing and gaming. The HDR on the X900H is fantastic especially for the price. Higher brightness may be better for some situations where a TV is in a well lit area. Dolby Vision actually has a range up to 10,000 nits. Much of this really makes a difference having a wider range of colors. The more brightness a panel can produce allows for a more gradient transition and range of colors that can smooth out things like banding.
 

Jrfeimst2

Posts: 7   +8
LED screens are really LCD screens using LEDs for backlighting. Them being MiniLED allows for more backlighting zones for better local dimming and HDR accuracy. OLED panels don't have this problem because they can just turn off a particular pixel to achieve a true black. The problem OLEDs have is they don't have good HDR in comparison to LCD/LEDs due to burn in, their peak nit is usually @540 nits. The brighter the pixel the higher the risk of burn in on an OLED. One of the ways they are improving on OLED technology is finding ways to keep the display cooler. VA panels often used in LDC/LED displays don't have burn in issues allowing them to get much more brighter. I highly recommend watching videos from HDTVTest on YouTube, he breaks it all down quite well.
Sorry man but my OLED hits 750 and looks way better than any crap Led with higher peak brightness with ugly *** blooming around bright objects. Heck look at the new Samsung mini led TVs on YouTube. They crush the blacks to prevent blooming and oleds actually have higher brights when it comes to say a headlight in a cave scene or candles on a black background because it doesn’t have to tone it down to prevent blooming like led TVs do. OLED is superior for HDR!
 

nnguy2

Posts: 276   +528
Sorry man but my OLED hits 750 and looks way better than any crap Led with higher peak brightness with ugly *** blooming around bright objects. Heck look at the new Samsung mini led TVs on YouTube. They crush the blacks to prevent blooming and oleds actually have higher brights when it comes to say a headlight in a cave scene or candles on a black background because it doesn’t have to tone it down to prevent blooming like led TVs do. OLED is superior for HDR!

For real. Having good black levels does more for image quality than cranking up brightness. Smooth color gradient from good black levels prevents the annoying color banding.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
Sorry man but my OLED hits 750 and looks way better than any crap Led with higher peak brightness with ugly *** blooming around bright objects. Heck look at the new Samsung mini led TVs on YouTube. They crush the blacks to prevent blooming and oleds actually have higher brights when it comes to say a headlight in a cave scene or candles on a black background because it doesn’t have to tone it down to prevent blooming like led TVs do. OLED is superior for HDR!
Cool story... Sounds like you have a really nice one. I was generalizing. There are always going to be some outliers. No need to get upset.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
For real. Having good black levels does more for image quality than cranking up brightness. Smooth color gradient from good black levels prevents the annoying color banding.
Black levels don't eliminate banding. There are several things that are in play. I never said anything bad about OLEDS. Burn in is a real thing and only effects people who use them in unique sceneries, e.g. as a computer monitor or if someone is watching something that has a lot of static imaging like ESPN tickets. I even stated in an earlier post OLEDS can just turn off for pure blacks. You are also limited to what is sending the signal as well. No need to get upset.
 

Jrfeimst2

Posts: 7   +8
For real. Having good black levels does more for image quality than cranking up brightness. Smooth color gradient from good black levels prevents the annoying color banding.
I’m not upset. I’m actually stating facts about mini leds that have been proven by professional calibrators. I wish you would’ve done research before stating how amazing mini leds are. Actually they aren’t that amazing. Yet... also those new Samsung TVs with this so called 2,000 nits are insanely inaccurate in color when they get that bright. It’ll get better but it is not what it’s all crazed up to be. At least not from Samsung which has been proven by professional calibrators. Watch this.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
That's your opinion. It's fact that with a higher peak brightness you can have a wider color range. Maybe that's not the feature you care about most. Just because it doesn't agree with you bias it's not a reason to get upset.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
You can always adjust the settings if something is too bright for your taste. Also you probably won't find much content / media pushing 2000 nits. HDR media in general only reaches 1000 nits, not many movies achieve this. Dolby Vision is only starting to show up in games, time will tell how this plays out. As with anything even 8k for instance there is very little that supports some of the newer features.
 

Ludak021

Posts: 449   +310
LED screens are really LCD screens using LEDs for backlighting. Them being MiniLED allows for more backlighting zones for better local dimming and HDR accuracy. OLED panels don't have this problem because they can just turn off a particular pixel to achieve a true black. The problem OLEDs have is they don't have good HDR in comparison to LCD/LEDs due to burn in, their peak nit is usually @540 nits. The brighter the pixel the higher the risk of burn in on an OLED. One of the ways they are improving on OLED technology is finding ways to keep the display cooler. VA panels often used in LDC/LED displays don't have burn in issues allowing them to get much more brighter. I highly recommend watching videos from HDTVTest on YouTube, he breaks it all down quite well.
I know what miniled is, microled is newer and far better, and most importantly-it's the current tech in higher end TVs that cost less than this monitor. MiniLED is ok for a $200<$400 monitor range in 2021 (yet, wled back light is all those are getting).
OLED is ok, but microled with something like nanoIPS or better is far better overall.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
I know what miniled is, microled is newer and far better, and most importantly-it's the current tech in higher end TVs that cost less than this monitor. MiniLED is ok for a $200<$400 monitor range in 2021 (yet, wled back light is all those are getting).
OLED is ok, but microled with something like nanoIPS or better is far better overall.
Yeah I've read a little about micro led. Things will always get better. Kind of hard to get to OLED levels of per pixel control. The future sure does look exciting. Even OLEDs are improving.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
HDR + Backlight with Local Dimming Zones. VA panel. Awesome. 4600 dollars? Wow
5120 x 1440 resolution, 240 Hz refresh rate is also a big contributing factor. New technology never comes cheap. I agree that $4600 is pretty steep though.
 

Bobbydpue

Posts: 125   +78
I know what miniled is, microled is newer and far better, and most importantly-it's the current tech in higher end TVs that cost less than this monitor. MiniLED is ok for a $200<$400 monitor range in 2021 (yet, wled back light is all those are getting).
OLED is ok, but microled with something like nanoIPS or better is far better overall.

"microled is newer and far better, and most importantly-it's the current tech in higher end TVs that cost less than this monitor."

Oh really?

MicroLED is a brand new technology with very limited production and availability. The only microLED TV I could find available for sale was a 110 inch modem being sold by Samsung in Korea for the equivalent of $156000. One model of microLED TV available in one very limited market is not something I would call "current" and it's certainly not cheaper than a sub $2k monitor.

"MiniLED is ok for a $200<$400 monitor range in 2021" What sub $400 monitor has mini LED backlighting? The cheapest monitor with miniLED backlight technology I could find on Amazon was over $2000.

How can someone make a post without doing a quick google search to see if they've confused one technology with another? How can someone just assume they are right without getting some perspective?
 

Bobbydpue

Posts: 125   +78
"The upgraded version is listed at 29,999 RMB, which is about $4,600, though that could be a placeholder." It's being listed on Amazon de for around €1700 for the 2021 version with 240hz refresh rate.
 

Ludak021

Posts: 449   +310
"microled is newer and far better, and most importantly-it's the current tech in higher end TVs that cost less than this monitor."

Oh really?

MicroLED is a brand new technology with very limited production and availability. The only microLED TV I could find available for sale was a 110 inch modem being sold by Samsung in Korea for the equivalent of $156000. One model of microLED TV available in one very limited market is not something I would call "current" and it's certainly not cheaper than a sub $2k monitor.

"MiniLED is ok for a $200<$400 monitor range in 2021" What sub $400 monitor has mini LED backlighting? The cheapest monitor with miniLED backlight technology I could find on Amazon was over $2000.

How can someone make a post without doing a quick google search to see if they've confused one technology with another? How can someone just assume they are right without getting some perspective?
I made it because, for example, Samsung made TV's with over 50 zones (with miniled for backlight) back in ~2015 (do your "google search"). If someone is still selling those things for $2000 and people buy them - go ahead, buy one. It's old tech, period. They increased number of miniLED's but it's the same tech. Me, seeing someone getting excited over being milked for 200 or 2000 zones (over 20.000 zones and up that microLED is offering) for thousands of $$$ is amusing. It has nothing to do with google search (I don't even use google search to search), I follow display tech.
It's up to companies when they are going to drop exclusivity and start mass producing microled films in a form that can be cut down even to 23". Yes, atm, they are not making microled films for anything smaller than 67~68"

edit: feel free to correct me with some links if you still feel I am in the wrong. From my perspective, investing in monitor with miniled today (you could have done that 2 years ago, Phillips had an ultrawide monitors with minileds, probably other brands too) is..meh. In Perspective, it's worth waiting for the real advance with microleds.
 

Jrfeimst2

Posts: 7   +8
That's your opinion. It's fact that with a higher peak brightness you can have a wider color range. Maybe that's not the feature you care about most. Just because it doesn't agree with you bias it's not a reason to get upset.

Actually higher peak brightness causes major color issue accuracy. The new Samsung is already been known to have a major skin tone issue that’s almost impossible to calibrate out. When you get super bright whites go pinkish red. It is a known issue and when it’s calibrated the peak brightness drops down. You may get a higher range of colors but you also get very inaccurate colors.
 

Thretosix

Posts: 92   +103
Actually higher peak brightness causes major color issue accuracy. The new Samsung is already been known to have a major skin tone issue that’s almost impossible to calibrate out. When you get super bright whites go pinkish red. It is a known issue and when it’s calibrated the peak brightness drops down. You may get a higher range of colors but you also get very inaccurate colors.
In practice what I'm saying is think of it like shades of grey. If you have 10 levels of brightness you get black, white, and 8 shades in between. If you have 100 levels of brightness you get black white and 98 shades in between. Same for every color, so the more brightness you have the more combinations you get for different colors. In theory 2000 nits you are looking at the capability of many more colors. Which when you look at gradients there is less color banding because there are more colors to blend. There is also color chroma and bit rates that effect this, so the brightness isn't the only factor. I completely agree with what you are saying. Too bright washes out the color. If HDR is done right especially dynamic HDR like Dolby Vision and HDR10+, only things like staring at the sun would produce super high brightness , they want you to squint as if you are really looking at the sun. The washing out of colors shouldn't happen unless your TV is not calibrated correctly or perhaps your input device is low quality.