Seasonic recommends using a hairdryer to pre-bend RTX 4090 power cables

midian182

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WTF?! Power supply manufacturer Seasonic has a surprising recommendation for those worried about issues with Nvidia's graphics cards using 12VHPWR or 12V-2x6 power cables: use a hairdryer to gently bend the cable before installing it in your case.

The burning and melting issues found in the RTX 40-series graphics cards, mostly the RTX 4090, are well documented. It's recommended that their power cables employ 35mm of space at the point of connection before they bend, thereby ensuring a secure fit, but that isn't always easy in those instances where a card is close to a case's side panel.

Seasonic has offered several recommendations for buyers of its power supplies when connecting them to Lovelace graphics cards. On the company's support page, it suggests bending the 12VHPWR or newer 12V-2x6 power cable using a gentle heat source such as a hairdryer. It also suggests doing this outside of the case prior to installing the cable, which should be done very carefully.

Many RTX 4090 owners bought one of CableMod's 12VHPWR angled adapters to address the poor connection issues. Unfortunately for those customers, the company recently announced a voluntary recall of its CableMod 12VHPWR 90-degree and 180-degree angled adapters (V1.0 and V1.1) due to a risk of the male connector coming loose and overheating/melting the GPU.

The number of RTX 4090 cards affected by the 12VHPWR connector is said to be considerable. Repair shop NorthridgeFix says it receives hundreds of the flagship cards, which have an MSRP of $1,599, every single month due to damage caused by the connector issue. Nvidia initially claimed the problem was minor and there had only been around 50 cases worldwide. It also tried to put the blame on users, claiming they were failing to plug the cables in correctly. If only they had used a hairdryer first.

Earlier this year, MSI offered a surprisingly simple yet effective answer to the melting GPU problem by adding brightly colored connection tips. If users can no longer see any color once a cable is inserted, it means the connection is solid. Gigabyte, meanwhile, "cut out" a piece of the RTX 4090 (above) to hide the 16-pin connection and change the direction it faces, allowing plenty of space for cables.

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Seasonic should get into GPU business, this way they integrate the PSU into the GPU.
I know this is a meme but....looks good.

FSydan6VUAA1wpL.jpg:large
 
Nvidia needs to dump this failed experiment and stop making cards that chug up to 600W of power (yes, you read that right, the cable is supposed to deliver up to 600W of power, and it's melting well before that)
You need to think of their end game. They plan on using 2 for upto 1200watts. 8 PCIe connectors on one card would be too many
 
Nvidia needs to dump this failed experiment and stop making cards that chug up to 600W of power (yes, you read that right, the cable is supposed to deliver up to 600W of power, and it's melting well before that)
Worst is that if it was just up to 600w then they could have done fine with current connectors. Like it's been mentioned, they wanted a new cable standard because they're planning to go well above 600 into 1000 watts territory and beyond.

Now when you think about that, think about this: 1200 watts of power is usually what some of your other household devices would use like say, a microwave oven or a washer machine. Yet Nvidia thinks it's ever going to be viable to cram in as much power as you would on a regular sized microwave oven into any kind of standard ATX size and that right there should tell you how insane is it to think they should cram even 600 watts into a PC case let alone 1000+

What needs to be said is this: Nvidia is just no longer investing into consumer products at all, they're happy to just re-label enterprise grade hardware meant for a data center where it would actually be reasonable to handle such power requirements because well, it's a data center: it's built around massive cooling and power requirements already.

If they cared at all about the consumer side of their business they would actually invest some R&D into something other than repurposing some of the Tenser cores into DLSS just so they can spend less and less and might even care about something that's aimed at consumers instead but that's very clearly secondary: Jensen decided he needs to just cram in an unreasonable amount of transistors and power into consumer products because he already built those for data centers anyway so might as well double dip.
 
Worst is that if it was just up to 600w then they could have done fine with current connectors. Like it's been mentioned, they wanted a new cable standard because they're planning to go well above 600 into 1000 watts territory and beyond.

Now when you think about that, think about this: 1200 watts of power is usually what some of your other household devices would use like say, a microwave oven or a washer machine. Yet Nvidia thinks it's ever going to be viable to cram in as much power as you would on a regular sized microwave oven into any kind of standard ATX size and that right there should tell you how insane is it to think they should cram even 600 watts into a PC case let alone 1000+

What needs to be said is this: Nvidia is just no longer investing into consumer products at all, they're happy to just re-label enterprise grade hardware meant for a data center where it would actually be reasonable to handle such power requirements because well, it's a data center: it's built around massive cooling and power requirements already.

If they cared at all about the consumer side of their business they would actually invest some R&D into something other than repurposing some of the Tenser cores into DLSS just so they can spend less and less and might even care about something that's aimed at consumers instead but that's very clearly secondary: Jensen decided he needs to just cram in an unreasonable amount of transistors and power into consumer products because he already built those for data centers anyway so might as well double dip.
It's going to get to the point where you have to have your PC wired outside because the AC won't be able to keep up with the heat generated from it. On top of that, even if you had an extra AC to cool down your gaming room they wouldn't be able to run on the same electrical line without blowing the blowing a breaker. Many places don't allow a single electrical device to pull more than 1500watts continuous 1850watts peak. We're gonna start seeing dual powersupplies again because you'll need a permit to install a computer PSU that exceeds 1850 watts and pay a licensed electrician to install it. That's not a joke, either. If something like that starts a fire and you don't go through the proper channels your homeowners or renters insurance isn't going to cover it. Suddenly your $2000 GPU could end up costing you or your family your life savings because you know people aren't going to want to pay hundreds of dollars to have someone else install their computer for them.
 
Only people living close to a fire department should buy a 4090.

I telling you your external power supply looking a good idea - as I mentioned - no need for a strength test to bend well protected cables - or your paint stripping hot gun (( more manly :) - yes I know women game ) ).

Plus why throw away a platinum 850 PSU - that is top class - and you bought extra modular cables to assist in your server
 
You need to think of their end game. They plan on using 2 for upto 1200watts. 8 PCIe connectors on one card would be too many
And you need to rethink the safety of every electrical device in your house, because you are going to start a house fire if you think pulling 1200watts from just the GPU is safe in any way.
 
And you need to rethink the safety of every electrical device in your house, because you are going to start a house fire if you think pulling 1200watts from just the GPU is safe in any way.
Are you trying to imply that 1200 watts is a dangerous amount of power to pull? Because LMAO XD. The only way that would start a fire is if you had old knob and tube wiring with overrated fuses put in....in which case you are at fault for playing with literal fire and win a darwin award.

People seem to forget we've already broken that number. The 2.0 kW PSUs came around during the days of multi SLI fermi. When you have 4x580s in a case 1200w is trivial.
Worst is that if it was just up to 600w then they could have done fine with current connectors. Like it's been mentioned, they wanted a new cable standard because they're planning to go well above 600 into 1000 watts territory and beyond.

Now when you think about that, think about this: 1200 watts of power is usually what some of your other household devices would use like say, a microwave oven or a washer machine. Yet Nvidia thinks it's ever going to be viable to cram in as much power as you would on a regular sized microwave oven into any kind of standard ATX size and that right there should tell you how insane is it to think they should cram even 600 watts into a PC case let alone 1000+

What needs to be said is this: Nvidia is just no longer investing into consumer products at all, they're happy to just re-label enterprise grade hardware meant for a data center where it would actually be reasonable to handle such power requirements because well, it's a data center: it's built around massive cooling and power requirements already.

If they cared at all about the consumer side of their business they would actually invest some R&D into something other than repurposing some of the Tenser cores into DLSS just so they can spend less and less and might even care about something that's aimed at consumers instead but that's very clearly secondary: Jensen decided he needs to just cram in an unreasonable amount of transistors and power into consumer products because he already built those for data centers anyway so might as well double dip.
We've done it before. just because modern ATX design is too stupid to understand what airflow is doesnt mean its not possible. My HAF cases had no issue with multiple fermi SLI setups.
 
Are you trying to imply that 1200 watts is a dangerous amount of power to pull? Because LMAO XD. The only way that would start a fire is if you had old knob and tube wiring with overrated fuses put in....in which case you are at fault for playing with literal fire and win a darwin award.

People seem to forget we've already broken that number. The 2.0 kW PSUs came around during the days of multi SLI fermi. When you have 4x580s in a case 1200w is trivial.

We've done it before. just because modern ATX design is too stupid to understand what airflow is doesnt mean its not possible. My HAF cases had no issue with multiple fermi SLI setups.
US outlets and the circuit breakers provide 120v x 15amps = 1800watts for the multiple devices on that breaker, which includes the CPU, fans, and monitors, and AC and if you so lightly push aside 1200 watts to use on 1 GPU, you likely did not consider the electrical wiring limitations in your house.
 
What I find funny is that here in East Europe people can ask for tri-phase 380v for home usage at 32A, while 240V 32A it's the standard circuit provided for new houses. You can ask for more if a company it's registred at the address and power tools are required.
This makes US 120v 15A looks like a circuit provided for a Christmas tree...
BTW anything above 48v can kill a human (in some conditions) and dont bother telling me 120v it's safer than 380v.
 
America actually has 240 volts into the house, it's just that it's split single phase, so a 120 volt circuit comes off one of the two ends of the output coil in the local transformer. Depending on the rating of the wires and outlets in a circuit, you can make a 120 volt circuit 20 amps with a simple breaker swap. You can also do 240 volt circuits which typically run large electric appliances like clothes dryers and stoves/ ovens by using a breaker that simply taps both 120 volt legs which come into the house - and using the proper wiring and outlets.
 
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Can we go back to 8 pins connector... I will not buy a GPU with that stupid 12VHPWR connector ever.
Oh if they make the card right its prob alright. Having cables pinned up against the case panel is the real problem. Either cases aren't wide enough or gpus need to relocate the connector.
 
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