Tesla shows off the high-speed crash tests performed in its lab

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

Last month saw Tesla’s Model 3 awarded the 2019 Top Safety Pick+ award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), having scored a “good” rating in all six of the IIHS crash tests. It also earned a five-star safety rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

To show how its car gained those safety awards, Tesla has released a behind the scenes look at the crash tests it performs on its cars. The engineer in the video explains that the test vehicle begins 340 feet away from the wall, and is pulled down the track using a steel cable.

Tesla workers also explain that they run thousands of computer-modeled simulations of the crashes before any physical tests take place.

“At the design level, we’ll produce 3D models of the parts, and we’ll simulate those using very complex and sophisticated mathematical models that represent the physics of a crash,” says the engineer.

There’s also mention of the Model 3’s specially designed front passenger airbag, which wraps around the occupant to prevent them from making contact with the interior during crashes.

While there have been a handful of reports of fatal collisions where Tesla’s Autopilot feature was engaged, the company says more than one billion miles have been driven with the feature enabled. In the second quarter of this year, there was one accident for every 3.27 million miles driven in which drivers had the Autopilot engaged.

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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
Based upon Tesla's prior foolishness I certainly would not trust THEIR crash tests ..... let's see what the Govt. tests say when they do it .....
 

tkabou

TS Booster
Perhaps this answers the question for you:


Hint: Each one received 5 stars in every category and subcategory from the NHTSA.
Probability is based on availability, and Tesla's are few and far around so naturally the probability of injury is going to be magnitudes less than say a Camry, Corolla, or Civic that are everywhere.
 

yRaz

Nigerian Prince
Too bad the very same thing that makes them so safe also totals the car in minor accidents. Due to the design of the front and rear subframes, if hit at certain angels the whole thing needs to be replaced which can cost $15,000-20,000. Further, many repairshops aren't qualified to do the work and won't even take the job.

I love Tesla's and would actually love to own one, but potential buyers need to be aware of this. It's a double edged sword
 
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EEatGDL

TS Evangelist
Probability is based on availability, and Tesla's are few and far around so naturally the probability of injury is going to be magnitudes less than say a Camry, Corolla, or Civic that are everywhere.
It depends on the independent variable. Your probability is the probability of getting injured inside of 'x' car, in relation to all the cars in circulation. NHTSA's probability is about the odds of getting injured in the event of a certain crash condition inside of 'x' car; thus don't caring about what you crashed with nor the market share.
 
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Hollow1838

TS Rookie
Probability is based on availability, and Tesla's are few and far around so naturally the probability of injury is going to be magnitudes less than say a Camry, Corolla, or Civic that are everywhere.
Well probability of an event can be trusted if you have a pool of data big enough to make an estimate which seems to be the case since they took it into account in their ranking.
If it was 10 accidents, it would not be accurate but 10k accidents should be enough to get an accurate probability of injury, one more or less accident with injury would'nt change the percentage.

Saying "probability is based on availability" is nonsense. Availability is a probability and has nothing to do with theses results.