US Navy orders AMD, Nvidia-powered supercomputer with 590TB of RAM

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

The Cray Shasta computer is being installed as part of the Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Program and will be located at the Navy DSRC at Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. It will be the first machine in the program to offer over 10 petaflops of power.

As you would imagine, the supercomputer will feature some serious hardware, including 290,304 AMD Epyc 7002-series processor cores, 112 Nvidia Volta V100 GPUs, and a 200 gigabit per second Cray Slingshot network interconnect. There’ll also be an incredible 590TB of memory, which should be enough for a few Chrome tabs, and 14 petabytes of usable storage, including 1PB of NVMe-based SSDs.

The system, which is expected to be operational by early 2021, will be used for aircraft, ships and environmental modeling. It’ll also be used on weather forecastings such as tracking hurricanes and their intensity.

“The investment and increase in supercomputing power at the Navy DSRC at Stennis Space Center is absolutely critical to Naval Oceanography. Delivering future capability upgrades to global and regional ocean and atmospheric prediction systems, to include later this year the Navy’s first Earth Systems Prediction Capability,” said Rear Admiral John Okon, the head of Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Command.

Cray signed three high-performance computing contracts with the US military worth more than $71 million back in August. Another Cray Shasta supercomputer was acquired by the US air force, while the Army Research Lab (ARL) and the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) will each get a Cray CS500 cluster supercomputer.

As of November last year, the 148.6 petaflop Summit system was the most powerful supercomputer in the world. It features 4,356 nodes, each containing two Power9 CPUs with 22 cores and six Nvidia Tesla V100 GPUs

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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
“The investment and increase in supercomputing power at the Navy DSRC at Stennis Space Center is absolutely critical to Naval Oceanography. Delivering future capability upgrades to global and regional ocean and atmospheric prediction systems, to include later this year the Navy’s first Earth Systems Prediction Capability,” said Rear Admiral John Okon, the head of Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Command.

What a shame they can't tell us more about what classified missions they also have in mind .....
 

mbrowne5061

TS Evangelist
But what about the problem nvidia have by a recurring error on scientific calculations.
Im amazed they would use such a buggy driver.
You're going to have to be more specific than that. I've had more issues with Matlab on an 2700X than I have with nVidia in any situation - and that Matlab bug was just a computation time bug based on MathWorks favoring Intel when selecting instruction sets.
 

PEnnn

TS Guru
What kind if antivirus will it use??

Imagine if it was secretly hijacked to do Bitcoin mining....and I wonder how many it can produce in a single day! It could easily flood the market and cause a crash....
 

Evernessince

地獄らしい人間動物園
What kind if antivirus will it use??

Imagine if it was secretly hijacked to do Bitcoin mining....and I wonder how many it can produce in a single day! It could easily flood the market and cause a crash....
I think you underestimate the Bitcoin mining network.

A 2080 Ti generates 26.5 million hashes per second.

The network generates 71.43 quintillion hashes per second.

Even if we assumed that all the AMD processors and the GPUs in the above super computer had the same hash rate of a 2080 Ti, it wouldn't even equal 10 Trillion. It's not even close to 1%. In fact you'd need to a 4 zeros for it to be close to 1%. Mind you this is a VERY rough estimate but you'd need a few of these super computers to even make a dent.
 
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cliffordcooley

TS Redneck
In other news, troops are forced to continue using XP due to lack in upgrade funds.

Seriously though I have no idea what they use.
 
I was going to buy one too but the heat and cooling costs and the maintenance personnel breathing would have seriously increased my carbon footprint and I won't do that (koff koff).
 

Eflow

TS Member
I think you underestimate the Bitcoin mining network.

A 2080 Ti generates 26.5 million hashes per second.

The network generates 71.43 quintillion hashes per second.

Even if we assumed that all the AMD processors and the GPUs in the above super computer had the same hash rate of a 2080 Ti, it wouldn't even equal 10 Trillion. It's not even close to 1%. In fact you'd need to a 4 zeros for it to be close to 1%. Mind you this is a VERY rough estimate but you'd need a few of these super computers to even make a dent.
So there are several hundred super computers worth of calculations processing bitcoin. All so people can speculate on the price of a digital currency. What a waste of hardware and electricity.
 
You don't think you're overestimating yourself?
No. I peed on more than 500 acorns in sandy soil on a permanent creek bed with hardpan only 6 feet down back in 62 to 65 while fishing in the Sacramento Valley in Northern California. At least 20 sprouted and weren't flooded or eaten by the jack rabbits and the place is now a park/protected area so they weren't cut down and are at least 2 feet thick in the trunk. That made me zero carbon for a lot of years even while drag racing a Ford convertible. Since I travel commercial tourist class flying I've kept it low enough so that eating steak reduces the cow burps enough to retain my 'zero'. That whole server thing would just throw it all off. (koff koff)
 
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Evernessince

地獄らしい人間動物園
No. I peed on more than 500 acorns in sandy soil on a permanent creek bed with hardpan only 6 feet down back in 62 to 65 while fishing in the Sacramento Valley in Northern California. At least 20 sprouted and weren't flooded or eaten by the jack rabbits and the place is now a park/protected area so they weren't cut down and are at least 2 feet thick in the trunk. That made me zero carbon for a lot of years even while drag racing a Ford convertible. Since I travel commercial tourist class flying I've kept it low enough so that eating steak reduces the cow burps enough to retain my 'zero'. That whole server thing would just throw it all off. (koff koff)
Important fact: one acre of new forest can sequester about 2.5 tons of carbon annually

A typical passenger vehicle emits about 4.6 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Even if you did assume that each and every acorn of the 500 were to grown (which is extremely unlikely) and that they all continue to live for the duration of your lifetime (also unlikely), even driving a single car would push you far away from being carbon neutral. In fact you likely aren't even offsetting 1% of your driving.

Of course, not accounting for anything else you do that might lead to carbon emissions.
 
I took a look at and looked up California Oak trees. I don't think they were valley oaks so I'm going with slow growing black oaks. Based on the .pdf, I see I should have peed on Georgia paper pulp pines instead but they don't grow in six foot under hard pan in the Sacramento Valley so I'll stick with what I had on hand.

Figuring oaks start producing acorns about the 20th year and get up to 25,000 acorns per year during their prime (still going prime on my group) dropping down to 2200 per year when they get to be 100. Lets see 20 (at their 30th year to be conservative) and at 7000 acorns (very conservative since they're growing on a permanent water source) would be 140,000 acorns and about 1 in 10,000 survive so thats 14 more trees per year starting in the 30th year and increasing annually, downstream. Add 25 more years (55 since) and there's about (25 x 14 x 20) or 7000 first generation tree spawns from long hours spent fishing and not thirsty and choosing my target.

I average, as my insurance shows, about 350 miles per year driving; mostly doctors' appointments I can't avoid. I once complained about the price of gas rising to the gas station guy and he told me the price had been falling for a couple of years. Apparently I was healthy for the couple of years between tanks. Probably drove a lot less than 350 miles.

I'm still thinking I'm ahead of the curve not counting Sacramento Valley housing development and the end of the park/reserved space. Also, you're not getting sardonic humor.
 

Evernessince

地獄らしい人間動物園
I'm still thinking I'm ahead of the curve not counting Sacramento Valley housing development and the end of the park/reserved space. Also, you're not getting sardonic humor.
I figured you were being humorous but I'm far too logical to not be a jerk and point out the numbers.
 
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