raspberry pi articles

Raspberry Pi Foundation announces revision 2.0 boards

Raspberry Pi Foundation announces revision 2.0 boards

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has revealed details regarding revision 2.0 of the popular micro computer released earlier this year. There aren’t any major overhauls like a new processor or more memory but instead, several minor concerns have been addressed based…
THINK IT: Interview with Raspberry Pi's Eben Upton

THINK IT: Interview with Raspberry Pi's Eben Upton

Eben Upton has had an interesting trajectory both as an entrepreneur and academic, founding a couple of startups over the last decade and a half, as well as acting as the Director of Studies in Computer Science at the University of Cambridge.

Now employed at Broadcom as an SoC architect, his latest “on-the-side” venture combines a little bit of each facet and is perhaps its most ambitious yet: reignite programming in schools with a cheap ($25-$35), compact computing platform that kids could buy themselves. But despite targeting students, his foundation's tiny computer has already captured the imaginations of tinkers worldwide.

Raspberry Pi: The TechSpot Review + How-To Setup Guide

Raspberry Pi: The TechSpot Review + How-To Setup Guide

Six years ago, Raspberry Pi set out to reignite programming in schools with a cheap, compact computing platform. Despite targeting students, his foundation's $35 computer captured the imaginations of tinkers worldwide, resulting in overwhelming demand.

Along with a hands-on review of the Pi, today we'll be covering basic steps for setting up the computer and other elemental post-installation tasks to get you up and running with applications. In other words, this should serve as a starting point no matter what you want to do with your Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi: the $25 computer

Raspberry Pi: the $25 computer

Raspberry Pi is a £15 or $25 computer the size of a typical USB stick. Created by games developer David Braben, the whole computer is on a tiny circuit board, with a USB port on one end (for plugging in a keyboard) and an HDMI port on the other (for plugging in a monitor or TV).