Review articles

Lenovo Yoga Book with Windows Review

The Yoga Book is one of the most attractive pieces of hardware I’ve used this year. Lenovo is aiming for the best of both worlds: a compact tablet that’s easy to hold and transport; and an on-the-go laptop that isn’t hindered by an awkward dock. But going from concept to actual product, how well does it work?

PlayStation VR Review

I’ve been using Sony's PlayStation VR for the better part of a week and have played a handful of the games that will be available at launch. I’ve been impressed by some things, turned off by others, and made nauseous by a few. Throughout that time I’ve also been disappointed. Read on for the full review.

HTC One X9 Review: What went wrong?

The HTC One X9 is a classic example of a mid-range handset. It has marginally better hardware than budget offerings - a 5.5-inch 1080p display, a Helio X10 SoC, 32 GB of storage, a 13-megapixel camera with OIS, and a metal build - but it just doesn't do enough for the price. It's not a terrible phone, but it's simply too expensive.

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Review

In Deus Ex's vision of the future, unchecked technological advancement has thrown the world into disarray as multinational corporations have grown as powerful as governments. (I know, I can't believe it either.) It's the year 2029 and breakthroughs in bioengineering have allowed humans to augment themselves with cybernetic implants... read the full review.

Beautiful, but so flawed: No Man's Sky review

No Man’s Sky is an unusual and contradictory game, one that asks very little of its players while simultaneously demanding a great deal. It’s a frustrating failure in many ways, technically unpolished and seemingly unfinished. No Man’s Sky reaches for the sun and comes back with a light bulb. I’m pretty much fine with the light bulb.

AMD Radeon RX 470 Review: Almost an RX 480 and that's a good thing

The Radeon RX 470 should be an exciting product for a few reasons. First, this is an affordable sub-$200 GPU within the reach of most gamers. Coming from the first Polaris 10 board, we expect this to be an extremely capable 1080p gamer while 1440p should also be playable. The RX 470 also only comes in a 4GB version, which I personally feel is the right choice here.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 Review: Titan X-like performance for a fraction of the price

As attractive as the GeForce GTX 1080 is, many enthusiasts are undoubtedly holding out for the much more affordable GeForce GTX 1070. Partner cards will start at $380, while Nvidia's Founders Edition will retail for $450. With Titan X and 980 Ti-like performance, the GTX 1070 looks like the best option for 1440p gamers, delivering well north of 60 FPS in nearly every game we tested.

Corsair Carbide 400Q Review: Affordable, Minimalist Mid Tower

With its vast experience of case building, Corsair must have foreseen that the Carbide 600C we reviewed last month wouldn't appeal to everyone with its inverted ATX layout, so its counteroffer seems premeditated. The new Carbide 400 series takes a more traditional approach while keeping the clean lines and curved solid-steel exterior of the 600 series for a great minimalist look.

Windows 10, the TechSpot Review

Windows 10 is the best Windows you can run today. This alone should make it a big win, not to mention the fact that it's "free." However I don't think Windows 10 is there yet. Can Windows 10 bring seamless updates that one or two years from now will make it the best, most polished desktop OS available, and still be called Windows 10? Microsoft must prove itself under this new direction.

HTC One M9 Review: Solid Evolution

HTC’s signature metal body makes a repeated appearance on the new One M9 and it looks absolutely fantastic. The two-tone, two-finish design adds an extra bit of flare to the well-crafted, premium build, making this phone one of the most attractive on the market today. But where does One M9 fall short and where is it better than the competition?

htc one m9 review

Mid-Tower Shootout: A trio of sub-$70 cases compared

Mid-towers are by far the most popular case form factor, supporting most full-sized hardware including the ever abundant ATX motherboards and power supplies, while typically costing only $50 to $75. In most situations, anything in that range will be adequate for a standard build, but Silverstone, Corsair and In Win have launched new contenders that are said to deliver the build quality, design, features and performance of pricier models without breaking the bank.