AMD boss Lisa Su says Ryzen 7000 launch won't experience availability issues

midian182

Posts: 8,308   +103
Staff member
What just happened? AMD finally gave its Zen 4-powered Ryzen 7000 processors their full unveiling last night. They arrive on September 27, but, as we've seen with so many new product launches—especially AMD's—there are availability concerns. However, CEO Dr. Lisa Su has assured fans that there will be plenty CPUs to go around.

As reported by PC Gamer, Su was responding to a question from the audience at the Zen 4 announcement event about supply chain disruption and whether it would result in a limited number of Ryzen 7000 CPUs being available at launch next month.

"It is true that if you look at the past 18 months there have been a number of things, whether its capacity limitations or logistics," said the CEO. "From an AMD standpoint, we have dramatically increased our overall capacity, in terms of wafers, as well as substrates and on the back end. So with our launch of Zen 4 we don't expect any supply constraints."

"Logistically it takes a little bit longer for things to get into region. So we're having this event at the end of August and we're on sale on September 27. One of the reasons for that time, frankly, is to make sure that we do have product in region so that people can really look at buying across the board."

The four Ryzen 7000 processors hitting the market on September 27 are the flagship Ryzen 9 7950X (16-core/32-thread) for $699, the Ryzen 9 7900X (12-core/24-thread) for $549, the Ryzen 7700X (8-core/16-thread) for $399, and the Ryzen 5 7600X (6-core/12-thread) for $299. Most of the chips are cheaper than the equivalent previous generation's CPU launch prices, which is especially welcome at a time when many new products, and some current ones, are more expensive than expected.

The pandemic's lockdowns brought a period of unprecedented demand for consumer electronic goods. Combined with Covid's impact on manufacturing facilities and the global supply chain, it resulted in a chip shortage that saw prices skyrocket and availability diminish as scalpers and miners gobbled up what little products there were. Graphics cards were one of the worst areas affected, though vehicles, consoles, CPUs, motherboards, and other hardware also suffered.

Of course, things are very different today as the chip shortage alleviates and expensive buys become less appealing to consumers worried about a turbulent economy. Nvidia, in particular, finds itself facing the opposite problem of low availability. The company is so desperate to shift an excess of RTX 3000 stock that it keeps reducing the cards' prices—and recent rumors claim they're about to drop even further.

It sounds as if AMD is going the extra mile by increasing production to ensure the shortages of the past don't rear their head again with the Zen 4 launch. We'll find out for sure on September 27.

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VitalyT

Posts: 6,399   +7,179
That's great, but it looks like it will take Ryzen 8000 to arrive before DDR5 products mature and reach a reasonable price level. I do a lot of virtualization, and I paid only 300 euro for 64GB DDR4-4000. When I can pay the same for 64GB of low-latency DDR5, I will consider an upgrade.

It takes a lot of pieces to make a good new platform. CPU is just one small piece.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,300   +951
That's great, but it looks like it will take Ryzen 8000 to arrive before DDR5 products mature and reach a reasonable price level. I do a lot of virtualization, and I paid only 300 euro for 64GB DDR4-4000. When I can pay the same for 64GB of low-latency DDR5, I will consider an upgrade.

It takes a lot of pieces to make a good new platform. CPU is just one small piece.
That's what I thought as well with the platform going 4 years - why buy ver 1.0 motherboards - they won't be cheap - let the dust settled - anyway I'll wait Zen 5 the 3D version maybe my 5600x will be just fine gaming at 1440p or 4k with a 3080.

The chase is better than the catch sometimes - I love travelling - but having met Swizz and Germans in perfectly designed 4 wheel campers in say South America - I always imagine them pouring over proper survey maps endlessly - checking all routes - forest roads , mountain passes for years before they head off . TBF lots of people built killer PCs to play simple games and websurf - they secretly hope - a flying sledge hammer accidentally hits it and destroys it so they built and even better one.
 

Raytrace3D

Posts: 355   +433
That's what I thought as well with the platform going 4 years - why buy ver 1.0 motherboards - they won't be cheap - let the dust settled - anyway I'll wait Zen 5 the 3D version maybe my 5600x will be just fine gaming at 1440p or 4k with a 3080.

The chase is better than the catch sometimes - I love travelling - but having met Swizz and Germans in perfectly designed 4 wheel campers in say South America - I always imagine them pouring over proper survey maps endlessly - checking all routes - forest roads , mountain passes for years before they head off . TBF lots of people built killer PCs to play simple games and websurf - they secretly hope - a flying sledge hammer accidentally hits it and destroys it so they built and even better one.
I currently have a Threadripper 2950X running X399 (a one and done platform) so knowing that AM5 will be supported for a few more years is promising. Time to upgrade!
 

defaultluser

Posts: 507   +389
If they have production up-and running, then why do you need extravagant launch prices again?

I hope at least this timer, it doesn't take AMD 8 months after Raptor Lake launch to cut prices
 

Vulcanproject

Posts: 1,577   +2,916
That's great, but it looks like it will take Ryzen 8000 to arrive before DDR5 products mature and reach a reasonable price level. I do a lot of virtualization, and I paid only 300 euro for 64GB DDR4-4000. When I can pay the same for 64GB of low-latency DDR5, I will consider an upgrade.

It takes a lot of pieces to make a good new platform. CPU is just one small piece.

I'm seeing some prices come down on the DDR5 side but of course it's still a premium product for sure. Just last week I spotted some Kingston Fury Renegade CL32 6400. 16GB worth of Hynix modules for 160 euros, around 300 for a 32GB kit. A test where it was left at stock voltage and latency, but bumped to 7000 comfortably. I thought that was pretty good when you're looking to game and 32GB should be plenty for some time to come.

I was tempted to hit buy but I'm going to wait another month until I can pick a new board and a CPU before I get the RAM, hoping even then there might be some better deals.

The 7700X is calling to me, however I can wait to see what Intel have and if there is any news of bigger 3D cache Ryzen models before I drop on a new CPU.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 8,241   +7,581
If they have production up-and running, then why do you need extravagant launch prices again?

I hope at least this timer, it doesn't take AMD 8 months after Raptor Lake launch to cut prices
Given the 5950X is listed as retail at Newegg for $799 (though its on sale now for $546) it would seem that the 7950X at $699 is a price cut over the previous generation. IMO, that is an example of prices heading in the right direction.
 

Nobina

Posts: 3,956   +4,540
I don't plan on replacing my 5600X anytime soon but I'm very interested to see how things pan out.
 

defaultluser

Posts: 507   +389
Given the 5950X is listed as retail at Newegg for $799 (though its on sale now for $546) it would seem that the 7950X at $699 is a price cut over the previous generation. IMO, that is an example of prices heading in the right direction.


zen 3 made quite a mess out of zen 2 launch prices, but were justified by silicon shortage

these zen 4 prices mostly maintain the zen 3 prices launch , except this time there is no shortage excuse! ignore the clearance box, or were not speaking logically about two sets of comparable numbers
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 8,241   +7,581
zen 3 made quite a mess out of zen 2 launch prices, but were justified by silicon shortage
Personally, I think the justification for the much higher prices of Zen 3 over Zen 2 was the fact that given the market conditions of the time, and the practice of Intel setting absurdly higher prices generation to generation, AMD thought that they could get away with the absurd prices.

This time, however, the market is nowhere near as strong, and AMD has realized that lower launch prices will encourage sales whereas the higher prices would deter sales in an already depressed PC market. In other words, AMD may have realized that they will not get away with pushing prices ever higher if they want to sell chips.

"Although the PC market is experiencing some softness coming off multiple quarters of near-record unit shipments, our focus remains on the premium, gaming and commercial portions of the market where we see strong growth opportunities and expect to continue gaining overall client revenue share," Su added.
As I see it, one way to keep the market growing and alive is to price new chip generations reasonably rather than viewing your customers as gold mines that will pay anything for your chips - as was typical of Intel.
 

Puiu

Posts: 5,873   +4,884
TechSpot Elite
The CPUs might be fine, but the mobos will definitely take a while to be in stock properly :)
The same with the RAM that officially supports AMD.
 

bandit8623

Posts: 434   +237
That's great, but it looks like it will take Ryzen 8000 to arrive before DDR5 products mature and reach a reasonable price level. I do a lot of virtualization, and I paid only 300 euro for 64GB DDR4-4000. When I can pay the same for 64GB of low-latency DDR5, I will consider an upgrade.

It takes a lot of pieces to make a good new platform. CPU is just one small piece.
Dont buy 64gig then....