Canoo's first electric pickup truck is teeming with functionality

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,084   +131
Staff member
Editor's take: Electric vehicle startup Canoo has officially unveiled the design of its first pickup truck. The unnamed model, seemingly styled after the Japanese mini truck, is less extreme than say, Tesla’s Cybertruck, but arguably just as eye-catching and perhaps even more functional.

Canoo’s offering will feature a number of practical features including a pull-out bed extension and a modular divider system, a front cargo storage area complete with fold-down worktable and electrical outlets, flip-down tables built into the side panels of the truck bed, side steps with integrated storage compartments and a third brake light that doubles as a cargo bed light source at night.

Optional accessories like camper shells and roof racks further expand vehicle usability.

Spec-wise, the pickup truck will boast up to 600 horsepower and 550 lb-ft of torque with dual motors. It’ll have a range north of 200 miles on a single charge and a vehicle payload capacity of 1,800 pounds.

Canoo Executive Chairman Tony Aquila said it is like no truck you’ve ever seen. “It’s the size of a Ford Ranger, can take the payload of a full-sized pickup and [has] the turning radius of a Prius,” the executive added.

Pre-orders for the production version will open during the second quarter of this year with the first deliveries potentially taking place as soon as 2023. No word yet on pricing.

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mbrowne5061

Posts: 1,809   +1,041
So I don't hate the feature list... but they need to sit the industrial designer down and have a little chat about aerodynamics, and what is pleasing to the eye.
 

netman

Posts: 624   +247
A Super Practical E-Truck versus the Musk's Cybertrach...!
 
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scavengerspc

Posts: 1,082   +1,032
TechSpot Elite
Why do electric vehicles always have to look so different? It's just a car/truck, not the interstellar suppository of the future
I wish I could give you more than one thumbs up for this. This Mars rover thing needs to die.
10 years ago we finally got the Teslas. Looked like a car. Interior looked like the inside of an Emergency room. Then Ford and Chevrolet put out the Focus and Volt EV's. They looked like a real car inside and out. Since then the EV's have looked more like this thing. The Mach-E is here and GM has things coming so fingers crossed.
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 2,402   +3,492
Why do electric vehicles always have to look so different? It's just a car/truck, not the interstellar suppository of the future
Because when you see these “announcements” they are from some startup that hired a CAD guy to render them a truck. This vehicle doesn’t exist.

You see the same thing from the big guys, see also the Santa Cruz concept from Hyundai or the renders of the new GMC pickup. The difference being these companies have actual engineers that hammer the comic strip look out of these concepts and make them actually work. These “electric” car companies don’t, for the most part. Tesla is really the only one that has actually put up instead of shutting up, and they looked normal.
 

shark975

Posts: 17   +13
Get this stupid EV sh!t off here. Noone wants this. They only exist because laws force people to buy them. If that isn't true, then get rid of the laws and mandates (you wont, and cant) and let them succeed or fail in the market without governments jackboot. Get lost, "Shawn Knight".

I mean I know I can wait to have a car that requires hours of charging (along with expensive rewiring of my garage) to go anywhere, vs 3 minutes at the gas pump (most efficient energy per volume by FAR) and good to go for days or weeks. Gonna be great /sarcasm.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 5,793   +4,000
Because when you see these “announcements” they are from some startup that hired a CAD guy to render them a truck. This vehicle doesn’t exist.

You see the same thing from the big guys, see also the Santa Cruz concept from Hyundai or the renders of the new GMC pickup. The difference being these companies have actual engineers that hammer the comic strip look out of these concepts and make them actually work. These “electric” car companies don’t, for the most part. Tesla is really the only one that has actually put up instead of shutting up, and they looked normal.
But, the Cybertruck certainly does not look normal.
Get this stupid EV sh!t off here. Noone wants this. They only exist because laws force people to buy them. If that isn't true, then get rid of the laws and mandates (you wont, and cant) and let them succeed or fail in the market without governments jackboot. Get lost, "Shawn Knight".

I mean I know I can wait to have a car that requires hours of charging (along with expensive rewiring of my garage) to go anywhere, vs 3 minutes at the gas pump (most efficient energy per volume by FAR) and good to go for days or weeks. Gonna be great /sarcasm.
IMO, fortunately humanity does not follow your model for advancement. If humanity did, I can imagine that humanity would think stone knives are the ultimate in knives and could never be improved.
 

misor

Posts: 1,418   +320
What is happening with brand names?
a canoo (which sounds like a canoe) is a pickup truck.
cobra and apache are attack helicopters.

and yes, I like the direction of vehicles going electric but do not see practical applicability currently due to lack of charging stations.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 1,082   +1,032
TechSpot Elite
and yes, I like the direction of vehicles going electric but do not see practical applicability currently due to lack of charging stations.
Ok, let's try another approach. There are currently 100,000 EV charging stations in the US.


The thing is unless you are in an EV you could drive right past a place to charge and not even know it. That's because so many are in grocery stores, Walmarts, Targets, restaurants, etc.

Gasoline stations in the US number about 150,000.


Only a fraction of those sells Diesel fuel. If you have the resources (computer or smartphone) you can find an EV charging station much faster and closer than a station with diesel. And nobody ever gets bitchy about being able to find diesel fuel.
 
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hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,296   +1,475
Ok, let's try another approach. There are currently 100,000 EV charging stations in the US.


The thing is unless you are in an EV you could drive right past a place to charge and not even know it. That's because so many are in grocery stores, Walmarts, Targets, restaurants, etc.

Gasoline stations in the US number about 150,000.


Only a fraction of those sells Diesel fuel. If you have the resources (computer or smartphone) you can find an EV charging station much faster and closer than a station with diesel. And nobody ever gets bitchy about being able to find diesel fuel.
There are places you can't go in an EV because there are no charging stations on the trip. I think the example route was somewhere in Texas to a state up and to the left. I wish I remembered the name of channel or the video.

Those 100K stations are pretty bunched up when viewed on a map.
 

misor

Posts: 1,418   +320
Ok, let's try another approach. There are currently 100,000 EV charging stations in the US.


The thing is unless you are in an EV you could drive right past a place to charge and not even know it. That's because so many are in grocery stores, Walmarts, Targets, restaurants, etc.

Gasoline stations in the US number about 150,000.


Only a fraction of those sells Diesel fuel. If you have the resources (computer or smartphone) you can find an EV charging station much faster and closer than a station with diesel. And nobody ever gets bitchy about being able to find diesel fuel.
the devil is the details:
In February 2021, the U.S. had almost 100,000 charging outlets for plug-in electric vehicles (EVs). A considerable sum of these chargers is found in California, with almost 32,000 power outlets.
lucky for those in california and in densely populated areas

with gas/diesel-powered vehicles, one can buy extra fuel tanks, and just live off the grid.
---
( I read somewhere the idea or possibility of just exchanging spent battery for fully-charged batteries in some charging stations, building more quick charging stations along the highway and selected areas, and building a quick charging station at home )
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 1,082   +1,032
TechSpot Elite
the devil is the details:

lucky for those in california and in densely populated areas

with gas/diesel-powered vehicles, one can buy extra fuel tanks, and just live off the grid.
---
( I read somewhere the idea or possibility of just exchanging spent battery for fully-charged batteries in some charging stations, building more quick charging stations along the highway and selected areas, and building a quick charging station at home )
I live in rural Little Rock (East End) and last I checked even here there are 5 charging stations within something like 14 miles and the closest one (besides my house) is just 4 miles away.

I only recently heard about the battery swap and it sounds interesting but I wonder how it would work with older or current cars. Changing them out is no big deal but it is also not as easy as changing the 12v battery either.
 

8600M GT

Posts: 17   +9
There are places you can't go in an EV because there are no charging stations on the trip. I think the example route was somewhere in Texas to a state up and to the left. I wish I remembered the name of channel or the video.

Those 100K stations are pretty bunched up when viewed on a map.

There are places you can't easily get to in an EV... but you can rent an internal combustion vehicle if you're going one of those places. There also are fewer and fewer places you can't reach every year; Tesla's Supercharger map (https://www.tesla.com/findus) is pretty extensive now as an example. Northern Montana and central Australia are gaps, but they are much more extensive than five years ago when there might have only been a couple routes to cross the continental U.S. Now it's, "pick your favorite highway."

Your example might have been something like Midland, TX to Roswell, NM. You can still find examples where it wouldn't be possible, but it's fewer every year, and it wouldn't surprise me if in 2 or 3 years, that route has a Supercharger too. It might already have non-Tesla charging options.

Point being, I think for over 80% of the population in the English-speaking world, the destination problem no longer exists, or can be solved by renting an ICE a few times a year. IMO the significantly bigger challenge is having home charging for people who don't own their own home. There aren't quite enough chargers in the wild for electric vehicle ownership to be a comfortable proposition for most apartment dwellers yet.
 

8600M GT

Posts: 17   +9
Did a bit more research on the growth of Superchargers, aided by a helpful article (https://cleantechnica.com/2019/07/06/tesla-supercharger-networks-evolution/). It went from 8 stations in 2013, to 1130 in 2015, to roughly 2200 today. Granted, the recent distribution is more worldwide, but even in North America, there are gains. You couldn't take the far northern U.S. (North Dakota-Montana) or trans-continental Canadian routes in 2019; now you can.
 

Underdog

Posts: 193   +108
What is happening with brand names?
a canoo (which sounds like a canoe) is a pickup truck.
cobra and apache are attack helicopters.

and yes, I like the direction of vehicles going electric but do not see practical applicability currently due to lack of charging stations.
Also consider the finite resource of lithium for batteries potentially limiting the trend.