HP's new 43.4-inch ultrawide monitor can replace your dual-display setup

Cal Jeffrey

TS Evangelist
Staff member

The S430c is a very wide monitor with a 32:10 aspect ratio. Its curved 43.4-inch diagonal display is equivalent to two side-by-side 24-inch monitors. It delivers a 4K quality picture with a 60Hz refresh rate. The LED backlights deliver up to 350 nits brightness with 99-percent sRGB color accuracy.

A webcam at the top of the display retracts into the bezel when not in use. The camera is equipped with IR, so it is compatible with Windows Hello if you are used to logging in with facial recognition. There are also dual microphones embedded into the chassis.

The S430c comes equipped with HP’s DeviceBridge, which can control up to two devices simultaneously without a KVM. DeviceBridge is compatible with Windows, macOS, and Android devices. This means you can hook both your gaming rig and your MacBook Pro to the monitor and use them at the same time. You can even copy and paste between the computers using keyboard and mouse controls.

Using HP’s Display Assistant software, users can easily resize display partitions to suit their needs. In other words, when working in dual-monitor mode, you can choose the size of each screen.

The monitor has one DisplayPort and one HDMI, both with HDCP support. It also has four USB-3.1 and two USB-C ports that deliver up to 100W of power for charging up to two devices at a time. A height-adjustable stand allows easy positioning. It also has a 100mm VESA pattern for mounting to a wall.

The HP S430c will be available on November 4 for $999. The price is not bad considering two decent 24-inch 4K displays will run you around $700 and will not deliver the same convenient features.

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Techboi10

TS Rookie
"The price is not bad considering two decent 24-inch 4K displays will run you around $700 and will not deliver the same convenient features."

Except 2 monitors at 3840*2160 isn't the same thing AT ALL than one monitor at 3840*1200. This is the resolution of this "4k monitor" that you didn't mention anywhere in this article.
 

SirDigby

TS Evangelist
Platinum
I love the idea of this - KVM solutions sound quite cumbersome with a lot of cables, I'm glad that there's some initiative now to integrate the functionality into a monitor, the idea you can copy/paste and drag/drop files between 2 separate PCs is great. I'd love one of these at home so I'm not always rearranging my desk when I WFH and need to access both my work laptop and my home PC - just a shame about the price!
 
It's very nice for $1000.

Definitely a good workstation monitor - although I'm not sure how good it would be for competitive gaming.
 

Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
Not bad but for those of us that have failing eyesight it's just not practical as two separate monitors. I think they would be better off to add some height to the monitor in order to better accommodate the wide range of users.
 
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captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
Not bad but for those of us that have failing eyesight it's just not practical as two separate monitors. I think they would be better off to add some height to the monitor in order to better accommodate the wide range of users.
"Height", is dependent on a monitor's diagonal size versus its aspect ratio. For all intents and purposes it has almost nothing to do with resolution. Accordingly, a 27" 1440p monitor is the same "height", (and width),as a 27" 1080p panel.

So, what exactly are you suggesting? I ask as another "old timer". I'd like to see 1600 pixels height, which of course, would lower the aspect ratio, but raise the physical height of the screen

Something else we're not getting from the article is the color bit depth Since HP is claiming "99+% of sRGB", I have to guess its 10 biut color depth, (1 billion colors), and as such, it will need one helluva hefty GPA to drive it.

(Of course with the monitor itself priced at a grand, I suppose that having a hefty vid card is already a given to any prospective customers).
 
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