Humble Bundle has raised $200 million for charity over the past decade

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,737   +140
Staff member
The big picture: Humble Bundle this week announced it has raised more than $200 million for its various charity partners since the concept was first conceived more than a decade ago. Here's to hoping the next $200 million comes even faster.

The first “Humble Bundle” launched way back in 2010, allowing gamers to name their price for a collection of indie-developed games and allocate however much of the purchase price they wanted to charity. This first effort attracted more than 130,000 people, prompting founder Jeff Rosen to launch a second Humble Indie Bundle.

Rosen and fellow Wolfire Games employee John Graham quickly realized the potential of what they had going on, and spun the project off into a separate venture that’s been in operation ever since.

Things changed in 2017, however, when Ziff Davis subsidiary IGN Entertainment purchased Humble Bundle for an undisclosed sum. A couple of years later, both Rosen and Graham exited.

Earlier this year, Humble Bundle announced it would soon be taking a mandatory 15-30 percent cut of sales off the top. This change, the company said, was necessary due to the evolving landscape of the PC storefront. “The update will allow us to continue to offer great prices on amazing games, books and software all while supporting important charitable initiatives with every single purchase,” Humble said this past July.

Regarding the $200 million milestone, Humble thanked the community for what they’ve been able to do thus far and said it looked forward to helping raise the next $200 million for global and local charities.

A quick check of Humble's site reveals several ongoing bundles, including the Tropico 20th anniversary bundle featuring eight pieces of content currently going for a minimum of $12.02 and the Fall VR Emporium bundle that includes seven games starting at just $15.

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Dimitriid

Posts: 1,511   +2,959
I bet that makes most people feel good. Just don't look up how much of that money actually made it all the way to helping someone in need and how much it went straight into the pockets of a "charitable" organization. And no, not the many volunteers there or every day employees but managers and directors of these org that basically leech almost all of the money for themselves as their "payment" or "expenses"
 

Phaetos

Posts: 63   +54
I bet that makes most people feel good. Just don't look up how much of that money actually made it all the way to helping someone in need and how much it went straight into the pockets of a "charitable" organization. And no, not the many volunteers there or every day employees but managers and directors of these org that basically leech almost all of the money for themselves as their "payment" or "expenses"

As long as Humble gives the money to the organization, it's up to the organization to manage the money donated to them after that. Your response diminishes and disparages the efforts of what HumbleBundle is trying to do. They are doing good work, what happens AFTER they donate the money is not up to them.

I give HumbleBundle all the props for trying to make things better for alot of people through the donations, it's a fantastic thing and $200 million is more than any celebrity has donated to a charity.
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 1,511   +2,959
As long as Humble gives the money to the organization, it's up to the organization to manage the money donated to them after that. Your response diminishes and disparages the efforts of what HumbleBundle is trying to do. They are doing good work, what happens AFTER they donate the money is not up to them.

They are doing "good work" and that's why they decided (And later walked it back due to community pushback) to disable the user defined split so that they could limit how much was going to charities and how much to them and henceforth, directly to support what I'm sure it's a purely altruistic enterprise without people there enjoying high salaries or anything at all.

You do what you want but don't be upset if some of us see charity organizations for what they are: a parasitic bunch of people taking advantage of morally guilty people and effecting no change in the world.
 

RedBlu

Posts: 47   +60
The 2017 buyout explains the slow decrease in bundle qualities and increase is questionable behavior and tactics.
 

Nobina

Posts: 3,492   +3,630
It's actually commendable what they've managed to achieve with their pretty weak offerings. They used to have 1 or 2 very good titles in their monthly, now it's mostly random shite.