Jaguar's all-electric I-Pace SUV will battle Tesla's Model X later this year

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

The most viable challenger yet to Tesla’s Model X SUV sprinted onto the scene Thursday. The 2019 Jaguar I-Pace SUV is based on a concept first shown off in 2016 yet as Digital Trends highlights, the I-Pace manages to retain many of the sleek lines that made the pre-production version so appealing.

The five-seater crossover is powered by two electric motors – one at each end – that produce a combined 394 horsepower and 512 pound-feet of torque. That’s good enough to propel the I-Pace from zero to 60 miles per hour in just 4.5 seconds.

Feeding the motors is a 90kW battery pack that’s reportedly rated for up to 240 miles between charges. Speaking of, the battery pack can be charged to 80 percent capacity in just 40 minutes when using a 100kW DC fast charger and was designed to last up to 10 years (at home with a Level 2 charger, reaching an 80 percent charge will take closer to 10 hours).

The cutting-edge technology flows over into the interior as well. The I-Pace will utilize the dual-screen InControl Touch Pro Duo infotainment system that debuted on the Range Rover Velar. It’ll even have an Amazon Alexa skill that’ll allow owners to monitor charging and other functions.

Jaguar’s I-Pace is officially set to debut at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show on March 6 at which time US pricing for Jaguar’s first all-electric production vehicle will be revealed. If you can’t wait that long, dealers will reportedly take your pre-order from today with the first models expected for delivery sometime in the second half of this year.

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yRaz

Nigerian Prince
It will cost three times as much and be twice as unreliable with double the maintenance costs.
 
The Tesla Model S and Model X are relatively large cars.

That's what all the EV upstarts have been missing all this time.

Being a compact car in a large body killed the Fisker Karma and will keep its sales minimal this time around as well.

#1 The market overwhelmingly favors SUVs and Crossovers now so selling a car of any type - especially without AWD is a battle.

#2 Instead of making small cars like the Volt and Bolt, GM (and others) should have been making EV based on their popular models. An EV Malibu or Equinox with no size degradation would do far better.

#3 There is no pressing force to put people into EV when gas is relatively affordable and plentiful.

The premium price of an EV is not worth paying for most - especially when the entire point of owning one is breaking even and being able to drive for free.

Most of these luxury cars leaving the lots leave on lease. Not financed. No one wants to keep these things when technology constantly changes so quick and long-term reliability is unknown.

And then you have to factor in range-anxiety. 240 miles of range sounds great until you try to do long drives without charging while using cabin heater or AC.

It is the PHEV that make more sense (at current) which shrug off range anxiety.

Mercedes and BMW will have a far easier time selling their new Plug-in E and S class or X-series than Jaguar will have.

The F-pace, by the way, is relatively affordable, fun-to-drive and doesn't suffer the range anxiety.
 

Lounds

TS Maniac
The Tesla Model S and Model X are relatively large cars.

That's what all the EV upstarts have been missing all this time.

Being a compact car in a large body killed the Fisker Karma and will keep its sales minimal this time around as well.

#1 The market overwhelmingly favors SUVs and Crossovers now so selling a car of any type - especially without AWD is a battle.

#2 Instead of making small cars like the Volt and Bolt, GM (and others) should have been making EV based on their popular models. An EV Malibu or Equinox with no size degradation would do far better.

#3 There is no pressing force to put people into EV when gas is relatively affordable and plentiful.

The premium price of an EV is not worth paying for most - especially when the entire point of owning one is breaking even and being able to drive for free.

Most of these luxury cars leaving the lots leave on lease. Not financed. No one wants to keep these things when technology constantly changes so quick and long-term reliability is unknown.

And then you have to factor in range-anxiety. 240 miles of range sounds great until you try to do long drives without charging while using cabin heater or AC.

It is the PHEV that make more sense (at current) which shrug off range anxiety.

Mercedes and BMW will have a far easier time selling their new Plug-in E and S class or X-series than Jaguar will have.

The F-pace, by the way, is relatively affordable, fun-to-drive and doesn't suffer the range anxiety.
Fuel prices are so much higher in Europe especially the UK, which is why diesel is over 50% of the EU market because drivers need to make traveling as cheap as possible. Europe is definitely going to be adopting EV's quicker than the US in the next few years, I wouldn't be surprised if Tesla end up making a factory in Europe. I'll be sticking to my VW diesel until EV's become mainstream.
 
Fuel prices are so much higher in Europe especially the UK, which is why diesel is over 50% of the EU market because drivers need to make traveling as cheap as possible. Europe is definitely going to be adopting EV's quicker than the US in the next few years, I wouldn't be surprised if Tesla end up making a factory in Europe. I'll be sticking to my VW diesel until EV's become mainstream.

Europe's adoption of EV will be mostly a result of legislation. The same goes for China and India.

IE: legislation against ICE vehicles in favor or alternative energy/EV.

A new EV infrastructure and EV vehicle development will absolutely demand high up front costs which will make ICE look cheap by comparison- in the short term.

I absolutely want to see more adaptations of alternative energy.

For example: every building should have solar collecting windows and rooftops - as well as EV charging stations out back. Take as much from the sun as possible.
 

ChrisH1

TS Addict
The Tesla Model S and Model X are relatively large cars.

....

And then you have to factor in range-anxiety. 240 miles of range sounds great until you try to do long drives without charging while using cabin heater or AC.

...

Mostly all correct & well said, however the heater/AC makes a great deal less difference than you might think. The things that make the most difference are the speed you drive at and the weather. Even hills don't matter that much, though if you're driving over a 5,000m mountain there will be some effect.

Charging stations are now so prevalent, however, that it's not usually a problem unless you're an outlier who likes driving 1,000km/day or 'going bush', in which case you'll want a very different type of car and probably represent a tiny percentage of the population.