Jensen Huang: Nvidia-powered gaming laptops will become the most popular gaming console

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

In Nvidia’s Q4 earnings call, Huang compared gaming laptops powered by Nvidia hardware to consoles. “Our notebook business as Colette [Nvidia’s Chief Financial Officer] mentioned earlier, has seen double-digit growth for eight consecutive quarters and this is unquestionably a new gaming category. Like it’s a new game console,” he said.

Huang obviously has a lot of faith in these PCs and believes they will become the most popular ‘game console’ around. “This is going to be the largest game console in the world I believe. And the reason for that is because there are more people with laptops than there are of any other device.”

While there’s going to be a lot of debate over whether a gaming laptop can be classified as a console, Huang has a point about the popularity of the devices. CFO Colette Kress said that retailers were stocking 125 laptop models featuring Nvidia’s graphics, up from 94 models the previous year. She added that the number of Max-Q designs had doubled.

“The fact that we’ve been able to get RTX into a thin and light notebook … is really a breakthrough. And it’s one of the reasons why we’re seeing such great success in notebook,” said Huang.

IDC reports that gaming notebooks continued to hold the largest share of the gaming device market in the second quarter of 2019 and grew 12.7 percent YoY. It’s estimated that 19.4 million gaming notebooks were shipped throughout last year, and that number is predicted to rise to 26.8 million by 2023.

Huang also talked about RTX tech and the lower price of the cheapest card—the RTX 2060, which recently had a $50 reduction. “One more thing about RTX, we finally have taken RTX down to $299. So, it’s now at the sweet spot of gaming. And so RTX is doing fantastic. The sell-through is fantastic all over the world.”

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Acer's lineup is amazing, I love the 900. Laptops are too scruched for me to work on, used to the expanse of a PC.

 
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Burty117

TechSpot Chancellor
I can see where he's coming from, the last gaming laptop I bought was a few generations old Alienware and it fried itself.

Modern gaming laptops though I've heard good stuff about, run cooler, quieter and are way more power efficient.

I've been looking into a gaming laptop for the last few months but have held back to see what AMD bring to the table.
 

m4a4

TS Evangelist
TechSpot Elite
I mean, I'm running an Nvidia gaming laptop right now.

But it wasn't cheap, so I'm not sure how gaming laptops (with decent price to get decent power) will be the "most popular gaming console". Especially when thinking of the casual gaming market...
 

wiyosaya

TS Evangelist
Huang also talked about RTX tech and the lower price of the cheapest card—the RTX 2060, which recently had a $50 reduction. “One more thing about RTX, we finally have taken RTX down to $299. So, it’s now at the sweet spot of gaming. And so RTX is doing fantastic. The sell-through is fantastic all over the world.”
This is bloviating if I have ever heard it.
 

QuantumPhysics

TS Evangelist
$899 buys a Core i7 with a GTX 1660, 16GB DDR4, SSD... or better.

$1000 -$1500 buys a Core i7 with an RTX GPU, 16GB DDR4, SSD ...or better.

Ain’t nothing from SONY or XBOX keeping up with that.

Gaming Laptops are outpacing desktops on cost-to-value

I take my gaming loop with me everywhere from work to vacations. Fits really neatly in my book bag and requires nothing more than a power outlet and WiFi.
 

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Too bad it's not going to be an I-7 with 32gb of ram sporting a RGB backlit keyboard with a 17" touchscreen powered 2080. I upgraded my 17" Acer from a celeryron to an I-3 (ebay purchase), I turn it on almost monthly.

$899 buys a Core i7 with a GTX 1660, 16GB DDR4, SSD... or better.

$1000 -$1500 buys a Core i7 with an RTX GPU, 16GB DDR4, SSD ...or better.
Bingo, I would buy that. I am never buying a $3700 laptop.

Ain’t nothing from SONY or XBOX keeping up with that.

Gaming Laptops are outpacing desktops only cost-to-value

I take my gaming loop with me everywhere from work to vacations. Fits really neatly in my book bag and requires nothing more than a power outlet and WiFi.
I would hate to see a contraction in PC's because "flattops" get too good, they are convenient though..
 

Evernessince

地獄らしい人間動物園
$899 buys a Core i7 with a GTX 1660, 16GB DDR4, SSD... or better.

$1000 -$1500 buys a Core i7 with an RTX GPU, 16GB DDR4, SSD ...or better.

Ain’t nothing from SONY or XBOX keeping up with that.

Gaming Laptops are outpacing desktops only cost-to-value

I take my gaming loop with me everywhere from work to vacations. Fits really neatly in my book bag and requires nothing more than a power outlet and WiFi.
Except that the PS5 will smoke that $900 laptop for anywhere between $400 - 600 USD

"The PS5 will be powered by a CPU based on AMD's third-generation, eight-core Ryzen processor, as well as a custom GPU based on the AMD Radeon Navi line. That graphics card will allow the PS5 to deliver ray tracing, which is an ultra-realistic lighting technology that was first made popular by Nvidia's RTX cards. As noted by TFT Central, the PS5 could even support Nvidia G-Sync, thanks to Nvidia opening up the technology to AMD GPUs.

According to a translated tweet from known hardware leaker Komachi Ensaka, the PS5's fast 2-GHz GPU could double the power of the Xbox One X, and deliver comparable performance to Nvidia's RTX 2080."

https://www.tomsguide.com/us/ps5-release-date-rumors-specs,news-26954.html

An Intel laptop CPU is going to loose in gaming performance to a 2nd gen AMD CPU, let alone a 3rd gen as is going to be used. Not to mention a sizable lead in efficiency and multi-threading. 8 cores vs 4.

The GPU is essentially a 5700 with a large overclock at 2 GHz. This should put it at least over the 2070. I expect this being a console to outperform the 2080.

So yeah, SIGNIFICANTLY more performance for less money. As to be expected, laptops have to make compromises to fit into a small form factor and power budget.

Even considering a $1,500 laptop, which is likely triple the price of upcoming consoles, it still will not be as fast as the PS5.

https://www.newegg.com/aluminum-black-msi-gp-series-gp65-leopard-9sf-240-gaming-entertainment/p/N82E16834155295?&quicklink=true

You are still only getting a 6 core Intel CPU that will likely be power throttled when gaming. Just as an example, the CPU in that pricey laptop gets 1227 points in CB multi-threaded. The 3700X, which is weaker then what is going into the console, gets 2101. Mind you laptops continue to downclock during extended gaming sessions as heat saturates the device, so really a short benchmark isn't going to give you the whole picture.

Laptop have never been a main competitor to consoles and that will continue. You are paying multiple times more for less performance, of which 95% of people can't afford. Not to mention laptops are targeted at those who need compute power on the go. Consoles are stationary. If people had the extra cash and don't need it to be mobile, they would buy a desktop first.

If anything, The Nintendo Switch and GeForce now will erode the number of people buying gaming laptops.

 

Evernessince

地獄らしい人間動物園
you have absolutely no proof of that.

And I'm willing to bet that anything a PS5 can run, can run better on an RTX laptop.
You mean other then the link I provided (you can really find this info anywhere though)

https://www.tomsguide.com/us/ps5-release-date-rumors-specs,news-26954.html

It's the same GPU as the 5700 OC'd to 2000 MHz. Results should extrapolate directly.

"RTX Laptop"? That's vague enough to not be a definite answer. Yes maybe a $2,000+ one or a next gen Nvidia 3000 series one. I should probably note that price, model, and release date are important variables that you should include in your reply if you are going to indicate such a vague response.
 

BigRedPDX

TS Booster
I mean, I'm running an Nvidia gaming laptop right now.

But it wasn't cheap, so I'm not sure how gaming laptops (with decent price to get decent power) will be the "most popular gaming console". Especially when thinking of the casual gaming market...
I am with you on that. I bought a MSI gaming laptop a couple years ago, and that laptop was far from inexpensive. PC gaming has not been my thing these past 4 or 5 years. The amount of modding and cheating going on, I switched to console for a while. I will always enjoy PC graphics more, but online game play needs work.
 

Fobus

TS Addict
Except that the PS5 will smoke that $900 laptop for anywhere between $400 - 600 USD
Bollocks. It's not $500 console vs $900 equivalent laptop. It's $500 console + whatever laptop you own vs a gaming laptop. Unless you have a need for ultraportable, your gaming laptop doubles as your daily driver. Windows and productivity, Steam and thousands of PC exclusives, portability in ONE package. What's the equivalent value console? You can't even calculate, because there isn't such console that can compete with a gaming laptop.
If you wanted value for gaming, you'd go for desktop.
 

BigRedPDX

TS Booster
Bollocks. It's not $500 console vs $900 equivalent laptop. It's $500 console + whatever laptop you own vs a gaming laptop. Unless you have a need for ultraportable, your gaming laptop doubles as your daily driver. Windows and productivity, Steam and thousands of PC exclusives, portability in ONE package. What's the equivalent value console? You can't even calculate, because there isn't such console that can compete with a gaming laptop.
If you wanted value for gaming, you'd go for desktop.
Also, bollocks... sort of. Depends on the PC build. I could piece together an $8000 masterpiece of a gaming build, but I wouldn't categorize that in the "value" field. you could piece together an $800 gaming desktop, but I would only expect medium performance. Consoles you're stuck with one performance fits all, which for us PC gamers, doesn't really sit well. I'm not gonna say whether I think 1 is better than the other, but I will say that if I could piece together my build sooner, I would probably be PC gaming more often. The laptop wasn't really meant to be used for daily computing needs. It was for taking your work and gaming on the road with you.
 
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Hi performance gaming has been running on tiny computers from $35 Raspberries to Latte Pandas (and others) with an Egpu or Parsec for years.


Laptop and console meet SBC. ^^ Dec 27, 2018. Latte Panda with an RTX 2080, smoking that "soon to be released" PS5.
 
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MuchHonest

TS Rookie
I can see where he's coming from, the last gaming laptop I bought was a few generations old Alienware and it fried itself.

Modern gaming laptops though I've heard good stuff about, run cooler, quieter and are way more power efficient.

I've been looking into a gaming laptop for the last few months but have held back to see what AMD bring to the table.

Like desktops a lot of people neglect reapplying the cpu thermal paste. over time they solidify and cake up. I bet your alienware couldve been spared if you had considered applying new thermal paste.

New cards are using less power so in theory will run cooler if they aren't computing too much with ultra high settings. I'm waiting for a laptop that can do 1080 on high-ultra with a solid 144fps since there are screens that do 144hz. I don't feel a need to go beyond 1440p on a laptop. that's just too small for a 15" screen.
 

BigRedPDX

TS Booster
Like desktops a lot of people neglect reapplying the cpu thermal paste. over time they solidify and cake up. I bet your alienware couldve been spared if you had considered applying new thermal paste.

New cards are using less power so in theory will run cooler if they aren't computing too much with ultra high settings. I'm waiting for a laptop that can do 1080 on high-ultra with a solid 144fps since there are screens that do 144hz. I don't feel a need to go beyond 1440p on a laptop. that's just too small for a 15" screen.
I wouldn't run that resolution on a small laptop screen, but it better output to a monitor or tv at 4k resolution. I mostly plug my laptop into a tv wherever I end up taking it. I get maybe 60 FPS at 4k gaming at ultra. Given it's a couple years old, I'm not complaining. That GTX 1060M really does a hell of a job.
 

Evernessince

地獄らしい人間動物園
Bollocks. It's not $500 console vs $900 equivalent laptop. It's $500 console + whatever laptop you own vs a gaming laptop. Unless you have a need for ultraportable, your gaming laptop doubles as your daily driver. Windows and productivity, Steam and thousands of PC exclusives, portability in ONE package. What's the equivalent value console? You can't even calculate, because there isn't such console that can compete with a gaming laptop.
If you wanted value for gaming, you'd go for desktop.
There are a few problems with your assumption that the price of the console and laptop should be added together.

1. Not everyone has a laptop or even needs a laptop. In fact with Smartphones, tablets, ect I don't see nearly as many laptops today as 13 years ago.

2. People who are purchasing a laptop and a console aren't purchasing them together. Most likely they have a low-end laptop for simple web browsing they bought at best buy 4 years ago for $325. They didn't buy if for gaming and therefore doesn't factor into the pricing when they are buying a console for gaming. Not to mention it doesn't effect the upfront cost of the actual console itself. A console is still $500, way cheaper then any equivalent gaming laptop.

I'd argue that a console lasts longer then a gaming laptop as well. Laptops often have very poor driver support. Gaming laptops specifically have battery and heat issues. Makes sense though, given you need to put that heat somewhere.

You are trying to compare apples to oranges. For people who don't need the mobility, the console offers a better gaming experience at a lower price. For people who do (and can afford it), they will buy a gaming laptop. It's as simple as that. There is no comparison, it's either you need it or you don't.
 
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ChristopherJack

TS Rookie
I bought a GTX 1060 powered laptop a while ago now & it still impresses me.

The issue remains the entry level graphics, if anything affordability has taken several steps back here where the lower mid range GT**40m, capable of playing most games at the time on medium or at least low, used to come with laptops starting from $500AUD, now these chips are rarely seen in PC's below $800AUD. Same with the GTX**50m, they used to start around $800AUD, now rarely seen below $1000AUD.

Price per performance seems to have only been going up in the budget range over the last 5 years or so. I get efficiency, cooling & primarily design are the priorities, they don't need to be that bloody thin, I'd be gladly pay a little more for something chunkier(to a point) that runs better. Not saying they shouldn't focus on these areas, just seems the frugal gamers get left far behind.
 

Fobus

TS Addict
Also, bollocks... sort of. Depends on the PC build. I could piece together an $8000 masterpiece of a gaming build, but I wouldn't categorize that in the "value" field. you could piece together an $800 gaming desktop, but I would only expect medium performance. Consoles you're stuck with one performance fits all, which for us PC gamers, doesn't really sit well. I'm not gonna say whether I think 1 is better than the other, but I will say that if I could piece together my build sooner, I would probably be PC gaming more often. The laptop wasn't really meant to be used for daily computing needs. It was for taking your work and gaming on the road with you.
Back when this generation of consoles launched, you could have build an equivalent desktop for the price of $500 console. Don't know how well it would have held up, but between free multiplayer and cheaper games, you easily save up for mid-generation GPU update, for example 480.
But that's not my main argument. The value comes from all the stuff consoles can't do, like productivity.
 

Fobus

TS Addict
There are a few problems with your assumption that the price of the console and laptop should be added together.

1. Not everyone has a laptop or even needs a laptop. In fact with Smartphones, tablets, ect I don't see nearly as many laptops today as 13 years ago.

2. People who are purchasing a laptop and a console aren't purchasing them together. Most likely they have a low-end laptop for simple web browsing they bought at best buy 4 years ago for $325. They didn't buy if for gaming and therefore doesn't factor into the pricing when they are buying a console for gaming. Not to mention it doesn't effect the upfront cost of the actual console itself. A console is still $500, way cheaper then any equivalent gaming laptop.

I'd argue that a console lasts longer then a gaming laptop as well. Laptops often have very poor driver support. Gaming laptops specifically have battery and heat issues. Makes sense though, given you need to put that heat somewhere.

You are trying to compare apples to oranges. For people who don't need the mobility, the console offers a better gaming experience at a lower price. For people who do (and can afford it), they will buy a gaming laptop. It's as simple as that. There is no comparison, it's either you need it or you don't.
1. It's so bizarre to me. Granted, mobile SOCs has gotten good, and maybe good enough for a lot of people, but lack of software and M/K should be a deal breaker for any modern person's computing needs, now matter how much Apples tries to kill off PC. More people should be reliant and be proficient in computer use now, not less... If that is really happening, these people will be left behind...

2. My point is they should be purchasing them together. Why have a separate crappy PC, separate crappy gaming device, duplicated monitors? Is $325 laptop even usable, especially from 4 years ago? Just because people don't plan ahead and waste their money doesn't refute my argument.

It's not about mobility. People don't buy laptops for mobility. Most of the time, they are used as stationery desktop PC replacements, just with an added bonus of them being mobile (which people are happy to take advantage of). Battery life is beside the point in such situations. Those who do travel a lot, and do work on the go will not be buying gaming laptops anyways. It's why Apple gets away with crappy GPUs inside of Macs. But if you a Mac which you tie to desk, and then a console for gaming, you're just wasting money...