See the most popular Android phones in every state

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

The data is provided by speedtest service Ookla (via PCMag). It found that when it comes to Android phones, the Galaxy Note 9 is the most popular in the US. It’s the top choice in the majority of states, especially those in the south and on the west coast.

Sitting behind the Galaxy Note 9 is the Galaxy S8, which was most popular in northern and some eastern states. Finally, there’s the Galaxy S9+, which was the top choice in two states.

When not exclusively looking at Android devices, the most popular phone in every state was the iPhone X. With Samsung and Apple taking 76.3 percent of the market, their dominance isn’t unexpected. As PCMag notes, after Samsung’s 28 percent market share, the next manufacturer is LG, which takes just 8.8 percent.

The Galaxy Note 9 hit stores in August last year, arriving to almost universal praise. The Galaxy S8, meanwhile, was released back in April 2017, while the S9+ launched in March 2018, so the Note 9 has gained the lead despite being the newest of the three.

As for the Galaxy S10 range, we might see some of Samsung’s latest phones fight their way to the top of the popularity list next year. In our Best of Smartphones feature, we chose the S10e as the best Android option for most people, while the S10 Plus was rated best Android premium phone.

Permalink to story.

 

QuantumPhysics

TS Evangelist
I've heard Android users are holding onto their phones longer than the average Apple owner - who is more likely to upgrade annually. (With the exception of iPhone 6s owners - mostly because of the headphone jack).
 

Hexic

TS Evangelist
I've heard Android users are holding onto their phones longer than the average Apple owner - who is more likely to upgrade annually. (With the exception of iPhone 6s owners - mostly because of the headphone jack).
Which is ironic given the minute, very slight changes that the iPhones go through almost every “new” product launch. Jobs would have pushed innovation.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Theinsanegamer

Theinsanegamer

TS Evangelist
That's ironic since Android phones are the ones with relatively short support.
That short support doesnt affect them. Android apps often still support android 4.4.4, an OS that came out whle I was in High School. the current version in 10 BTW.

So what if you dont get OS updates? The apps are the same regardless. People make a big game about "muh security" but phones are walled gardens, it is incredibly difficult to infect a phone through a browser (especially as the browser is updated independant of the OS, see the app situation above). The most common method is infected PLAY store apps, and that works regardless of android version.

iPhones, OTOH, once the OS is no longer updates the clock is ticking. After a year or two, apps begin to drop off from supporting the older OSes. The Safari browser is no longer updates, and begins to have compatibility problems. iOS's update system ensures tha tapp developers only support the latest OSes unless they have to support older ones for their niche audience.
 
  • Like
Reactions: cliffordcooley

roberthi

TS Addict
That's ironic since Android phones are the ones with relatively short support.
While your iPhone (even the latest) has a warranty of 1 year, my LG G8X (released almost a year ago) has a 2 year warranty. I've had no problems with it.

My Samsung S6 Edge from about 5 years ago had 1 year warranty, but aside from the last two patches causing major battery drain, I had no issues.

This means that aside from warranty-related fixes, updates are the only real area for support on any phone and updates aren't always a good thing.
 

Branoli

TS Rookie
While your iPhone (even the latest) has a warranty of 1 year, my LG G8X (released almost a year ago) has a 2 year warranty. I've had no problems with it.

My Samsung S6 Edge from about 5 years ago had 1 year warranty, but aside from the last two patches causing major battery drain, I had no issues.

This means that aside from warranty-related fixes, updates are the only real area for support on any phone and updates aren't always a good thing.
I agree with you about updates not always being a good thing. I have a Galaxy S7 and the last update unmounted my SD card. Since it had never happened before when I discovered that all my photos and music was gone I was in a panic. I finally figured out that the SD card was just unmounted so was able to remount it. I might be less likely to do the next update but if I do and that stuff is gone again at least I will know how to get it back. I hope it will be that easy anyway.
 

Nobina

TS Evangelist
That short support doesnt affect them. Android apps often still support android 4.4.4, an OS that came out whle I was in High School. the current version in 10 BTW.

So what if you dont get OS updates? The apps are the same regardless. People make a big game about "muh security" but phones are walled gardens, it is incredibly difficult to infect a phone through a browser (especially as the browser is updated independant of the OS, see the app situation above). The most common method is infected PLAY store apps, and that works regardless of android version.

iPhones, OTOH, once the OS is no longer updates the clock is ticking. After a year or two, apps begin to drop off from supporting the older OSes. The Safari browser is no longer updates, and begins to have compatibility problems. iOS's update system ensures tha tapp developers only support the latest OSes unless they have to support older ones for their niche audience.
While your iPhone (even the latest) has a warranty of 1 year, my LG G8X (released almost a year ago) has a 2 year warranty. I've had no problems with it.

My Samsung S6 Edge from about 5 years ago had 1 year warranty, but aside from the last two patches causing major battery drain, I had no issues.

This means that aside from warranty-related fixes, updates are the only real area for support on any phone and updates aren't always a good thing.
I agree about the update thing but I just found it interesting that iPhone users buy them annually while some like to talk about Android having short update support.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Branoli