Zuckerberg has 'no plans' to attend UK data privacy hearing despite threat of formal summons

By Polycount · 16 replies
May 15, 2018
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  1. The Cambridge Analytica data privacy controversy has caused quite a few problems for Facebook.

    The company has actively taken steps to address user concerns, but users weren't the only ones who had tough questions for the social media platform.

    In April, company CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress twice over the course of two days to answer virtually any question thrown at him, though how substantial his answers were has been the topic of much debate.

    At any rate, the UK decided they'd like to ask Zuckerberg a few questions of their own, requesting that the CEO appear before the UK's Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee.

    Unfortunately for Parliament, Zuckerberg declined to appear in March, sending fellow executive Mike Schroepfer to testify in his stead.

    Schroepfer's responses weren't enough to satisfy Parliament, though. As a result, the Committee once again asked Zuckerberg to answer their questions, using much stronger language this time around.

    Indeed, the Committee made it clear that should Zuckerberg decline their invitation again, they would consider issuing a "formal summons" compelling his appearance the next time he enters the UK.

    It seems the CEO isn't too worried about the Committee's "invitation," though. According to Parliament, Facebook says Zuckerberg has "no plans" to travel to the UK anytime soon.

    "If Mark Zuckerberg truly recognises the ‘seriousness’ of these issues as they say they do, we would expect that he would want to appear in front of the Committee and answer questions that are of concern not only to Parliament, but Facebook’s tens of millions of users in this country," Committee Chair Damian Collins MP said in a statement.

    Collins went on to invite Zuckerberg to testify by video, should that prove more convenient for the CEO. Facebook has not yet responded to this new invitation, but we'll update this article if we learn more.

    Permalink to story.

     
  2. wiyosaya

    wiyosaya TS Evangelist Posts: 2,847   +1,389

    All hail King Zuckerberg!
     
  3. ForgottenLegion

    ForgottenLegion TS Maniac Posts: 246   +240

    Can't blame him after the grilling he got in the US.
     
    Teko03 and OutlawCecil like this.
  4. Adhmuz

    Adhmuz TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,861   +666

    To my amazement people continue to use Facebook and not actually know what is going on behind their backs. Zuckerberg's actions on the other hand are of no surprise however, he clearly has become void of all traces of what may be referred to as a soul.
     
    crocography, wiyosaya and SirChocula like this.
  5. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TS Guardian Fighter Posts: 10,462   +4,341

    Sounds familiar, much like the rest of society.
     
    JaredTheDragon and wiyosaya like this.
  6. Uncle Al

    Uncle Al TS Evangelist Posts: 4,164   +2,637

    After the sins he committed he should attend each and EVERY hearing, grilling, thrashing, etc. And those countries should show no mercy to him or his company, after all, all of this didn't happen by accident; it was well planned with him reaping the financial benefits ......
     
  7. treetops

    treetops TS Evangelist Posts: 2,216   +333

    Yeah Europe doesn't f around, he's scurred.
     
    crocography likes this.
  8. Ravey

    Ravey TS Booster Posts: 87   +31

    There's only one way to get Mark Zuckerberg to come to the UK to answer questions, and that's to shut down access to facebook in the uk until he agrees to to turn up in front of parliament. It's only an inconvenience to users in the uk if we lose access, but to Facebook it will hit them where it hurts.. The Shareholders.
     
    crocography likes this.
  9. Bubbajim

    Bubbajim TS Evangelist Posts: 428   +383

    Facebook has like 2 billion users worldwide, and about 35 million users in the UK. I'm sure they wouldn't care too much to temporarily lose access to the UK.

    Also, no UK politician would want to be the MP who stole Facebook. Plus in the current Cabinet it'd likely be Matt Hancock or Sajid Javid who had to make that decision, and neither of them would dream of it.
     
  10. iamcts

    iamcts TS Member Posts: 51   +21

    Congress did everything but grill him. Our representatives in Congress are quite useless, and the majority of the gray-hairs don't even know how Facebook works, or the internet for that matter. He came out completely unscathed, and their stock recovered to pre-scandal levels.
     
  11. Bubbajim

    Bubbajim TS Evangelist Posts: 428   +383

    "So Mr Zuckerfeller, say I wanted my grandkids to give me a Facebook, do I need a special shelf for it? Will it fit on a memory doo-dah or should I just Internet it?"
     
  12. Teko03

    Teko03 TS Evangelist Posts: 507   +273

    My first thought...after seeing him sweat, I don't think he wants to go through any thing like that ever again.
     
  13. Capaill

    Capaill TS Evangelist Posts: 615   +293

    Oh for God's sake, he can't go to every single country in the world just because they want to ask him questions. If he attended a congressional hearing in the country where his company is based, that should be enough. He has got lesser staff to attend anything else in his place.

    Also, what sort of a mickey mouse hearing is "UK's Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee"? That commands no respect.

    Personally I don't see why FB is getting such hate. We have always known that the social media aspect of the site was just a front for a massive data mining and data selling business. You don't stay in business by offering free accounts to play game on and post photos of what people ate. The use of data by Cambridge Analytica to swing votes in various countries is a problem with Cambridge Analytica and businesses like that should be investigated and shut down ASAP. Alternatively, if people are worried about fake and troll FB accounts swinging votes, then they exist on every social media platform. I'm sure Twitter and YouTube have millions of them. Why blame FB specifically?
     
  14. wiyosaya

    wiyosaya TS Evangelist Posts: 2,847   +1,389

    Zuck should just own up to his part in the matter; however, I expect he will lack the integrity to do so.
    538 million fake accounts, and if that is not enough, consider this: They are part of the problem, and cracking down on the parasites has to start somewhere especially given the magnitude of known garbage they enable within their system.
     
  15. Burty117

    Burty117 TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 3,307   +1,077

    Haha! People in the comment section who thinks Zuck got a grilling from Congress.
    Did you even watch any of it? It was a joke, they had like 2 decent questions out of (what felt like) hundreds that they asked him. Hell the majority of them don't even realize most websites on the internet are funded by Ad revenue...

    It was extremely painful to watch, not for Zuck, I felt for Zuck, he basically had to explain to his grandpa how the internet works, it was most embarrassing for Congress as they didn't have many relevant questions to ask and he got mostly duplicate questions from them.
     
    mbrowne5061 likes this.
  16. Polycount

    Polycount TS Guru Topic Starter Posts: 1,020   +243

    It's worth pointing out that the UK's questions to Zuckerberg's colleague Schroepfer were significantly more informed and on-topic.

    This is just my opinion, but if I had to guess why he's ducking out of the UK hearings, it's because he knows he'll get much tougher questions.

    I could be wrong, though.
     
  17. JaredTheDragon

    JaredTheDragon TS Guru Posts: 402   +266

    And yet NPR is reporting that he IS going.
     

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