In perspective: The way we pay for video games has changed drastically over the years. Buying a title does not always mean getting the entire experience at the sticker price. Microtransactions for cosmetic items are a popular monetization technique to help studios with the costs of continued support. However, players generally frown on developers who paywall content that is essential for game progress, like cars in a racing game.

Over the weekend, Polyphony Digital pushed a patch that effectively nerfed credit collection in Gran Turismo 7. Gaining credits is much slower now because of reduced payouts on many races. Players view it as a money grab by Sony and Polyphony since it pushes them to grind for days and days for a single car or purchase credits. Credits average $20 per 2 million, but some of the elite racecars in the game cost tens of millions of credits. Buying just one outright can cost as much as $200.

Players were not happy about the move and showed their anger by review-bombing the game on Metacritic. As of publication, the user score has reached an all-time record-breaking low of 1.8/10. Whether Polyphony will rebalance progression remains to be seen, but fans are not waiting around.

A player who goes by Septomor has developed a PC script that autoruns races while you are AFK. While you cannot run a PC script directly within the PlayStation exclusive game, you can implement it using Sony's Remote Play app.

Getting it set up is a bit technical because you have to run the game using specific (non-default) game settings. YouTuber iLLmatic made a tutorial video showing everything you have to do to get the script performing for you (above).

Once working, you can leave and do what you want or minimize the Remote Play window while doing other things on your PC as the script grinds out races. It produces roughly 550,000-650,000 credits per hour with no further user input.

Polyphony's nerfing of GT7's progression system has garnered plenty of negative press and waves of fan criticism. We have seen developers reverse similar decisions in the past due to harsh backlash—the Star Wars Battlefront 2 grind-fest fiasco comes immediately to mind.

There is no guarantee Sony and Polyphony will cave to the pressure, but hobbling the progression system after millions of players have bought the game seems like a greasy bait-and-switch tactic. If it were a free-to-play title, that would be understandable, but at $70, players feel the grind to earn in-game content should be more reasonable.