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Intel S-series CPUs Power to Performance Comparison: Core i7 4790 vs. 4790S

You may be familiar with Intel naming their processors under the Core i7, i5 and i3 moniker based on the performance and features offered. But beyond that there are also a handful of different product lines within each of those brands identified by a K, X, S or T appended to the model name. In this article, we'll cover the 'S' product line in particular to determine the actual performance, power draw, and thermal differences compared to its standard counterpart.

The Best CPU for the Money: AMD FX vs. Intel Budget Shootout

These days you might expect buying a new processor to be fairly straightforward. The choice seems clear: Intel has proven to offer superior core performance with considerably greater efficiency. However, many enthusiasts argue that AMD offers better overclocking on its more affordable processors and therefore delivers a better bang for your buck. We put that notion to the test.

Enthusiast Territory: The most memorable overclocking-friendly CPUs

Enthusiasts have been pushing the limits of silicon for as long as microprocessors have existed. Early overclocking endeavors involved soldering and replacing crystal clock oscillators, but evolving standards brought options for changing system bus speeds, while some of the most daring would gain boosts through hard modding. These are but a few of the landmark processors revered for their overclocking prowess.

Quantified: How high temperatures, cooling affect CPU performance

Older CPUs would simply fail if they started to overheat, but modern CPUs adjust their frequency based on temperature (among other things) to prevent a dramatic failure. Because of this, it stands to reason that once you reach certain temps, you will no longer be getting the maximum performance from your CPU because it will be busy protecting itself. But what is that temperature? And do you really need a high-end liquid-cooled system to get peak performance?