overclocking articles

Water Cooling 101: What to do and what to avoid

Water cooling systems -- whether they are a custom loop or an AIO -- all follow the same basic principles. You have the reservoir, the pump, the radiator, the fans, some tubing, a block (for either the CPU, GPU, or both), and the water itself. After years of working with water cooling kits, here are some important tips to help you get the most out of your system.

Intel Core i7-6700K Review: Skylake arrives with the latest 'tock'

Whereas Broadwell was a 'tick' in Intel's "tick-tock" release cycle, Skylake is a 'tock', which means the same manufacturing process along architecture improvements. Chief among the changes is a new LGA1151 socket, which will require a new motherboard that supports an Intel 100 Series chipset, as well as support for DDR4 memory. On hand today we have the Core i7-6700K, a quad-core processor operating at a base clock of 4.0GHz.

Enthusiast Territory: The most memorable overclocking-friendly CPUs

Enthusiasts have been pushing the limits of silicon for as long as microprocessors have existed. Early overclocking endeavors involved soldering and replacing crystal clock oscillators, but evolving standards brought options for changing system bus speeds, while some of the most daring would gain boosts through hard modding. These are but a few of the landmark processors revered for their overclocking prowess.

Quantified: How high temperatures, cooling affect CPU performance

Older CPUs would simply fail if they started to overheat, but modern CPUs adjust their frequency based on temperature (among other things) to prevent a dramatic failure. Because of this, it stands to reason that once you reach certain temps, you will no longer be getting the maximum performance from your CPU because it will be busy protecting itself. But what is that temperature? And do you really need a high-end liquid-cooled system to get peak performance?

Intel Pentium Anniversary Edition Review: Back to its Legendary Overclocking Roots

For more than a decade tech-savvy users on a budget would commonly buy a sub-$100 CPU and achieve performance comparable to $200-$300 chips by overclocking. These days Intel locks down its lower end parts, but to mark the 20th anniversary of its Pentium brand, they've released a fully unlocked dual-core Pentium G3258 for $72 -- just what the overclocking community has been waiting for. We'll put it through its paces in a couple of builds of our own.