TechSpot

Overclocking articles

Intel releases update to disable Skylake non-K CPU overclocking

Late last year, several motherboard manufacturers including ASRock released updates to their boards that allowed users to overclock locked Intel 'Skylake' CPUs. This meant that some of Intel's lower-priced SKUs suddenly became great value, as overclocking them delivered performance in…

Exclusive: BCLK overclocking non-K Intel Skylake CPUs is now possible, tested here

In overclocking circles it was recently noted that BCLK (base clock) overclocking might become a possibility in Skylake processors, but it would be up to motherboard manufacturers to circumvent Intel's restrictions. Last night Asrock contacted us with an updated BIOS that enabled this. We jumped at the opportunity and have already tested and benched a Core i3-6100 Skylake CPU with a 1GHz overclock (4.7GHz) on air cooling.

Intel Core i7-6700K Review: Skylake arrives with the latest 'tock'

Whereas Broadwell was a 'tick' in Intel's "tick-tock" release cycle, Skylake is a 'tock', which means the same manufacturing process along architecture improvements. Chief among the changes is a new LGA1151 socket, which will require a new motherboard that supports an Intel 100 Series chipset, as well as support for DDR4 memory. On hand today we have the Core i7-6700K, a quad-core processor operating at a base clock of 4.0GHz.

G.Skill claims the DDR4 overclocking world record

G.Skill has claimed the world record for the fastest, overclocked DDR4 memory by boosting a single 4GB module of their Ripjaws 4 Series DDR4 RAM up to 4,255 MHz with timings of 18-18-18-63. As the modules are typically clocked at 2,400 MHz,…

Quantified: How high temperatures, cooling affect CPU performance

Older CPUs would simply fail if they started to overheat, but modern CPUs adjust their frequency based on temperature (among other things) to prevent a dramatic failure. Because of this, it stands to reason that once you reach certain temps, you will no longer be getting the maximum performance from your CPU because it will be busy protecting itself. But what is that temperature? And do you really need a high-end liquid-cooled system to get peak performance?