AMD at CES 2021: Watch Lisa Su's keynote here

midian182

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Something to look forward to: Nvidia isn’t the only PC gaming giant holding a keynote at CES 2021 today. Team green’s big rival, AMD will be presenting an event at 8am PT / 11am ET hosted by CEO Dr. Lisa Su, and you can watch the whole thing right here.

While Nvidia is expected to reveal the mobile versions of its RTX 3000 series graphics cards, the main item on AMD’s menu is likely its Ryzen 5000 mobility CPUs. Made of up both Zen 2-based (Renoir Refresh) Lucienne and Zen 3-based Cezanne parts, AMD will placing the chips up against Intel’s Tiger Lake CPUs.

According to PassMark’s figures, AMD recently overtook Intel when it comes to global desktop market share for the first time in fifteen years, though it remains far behind Chipzilla in the laptop segment.

Elsewhere, we might hear about AMD's EPYC 7763 (codename Milan) Zen 3 server processors that feature up to 64 cores.

AMD could also lift the lid on its Navi 22-based Radeon RX 6700 XT and Radeon RX 6700, which are said to launch at the end of March and sell for under $500. The former card is rumored to have 40 compute units, 2,560 stream processors, between 12GB to 16GB VRAM, a 192-bit memory interface, and up to 384GB/s of bandwidth. That could put it near the excellent RTX 3060 Ti in terms of price vs. performance.

Make sure to come back later to see what AMD has in store.

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VitalyT

Posts: 5,272   +4,538
Lisa Su is a true artist, drawing CPU-s and GPU-s on paper, and then releasing the paper for whoever wants it. Very generous too. Expecting another paper release today...

 

EdmondRC

Posts: 45   +34
Seems more like a victory lap for AMD than any 'big' reveals. The mobile processors we kind of knew were coming so not a big surprise there. AMD also hasn't made a big deal of their keynote. I know Nvidia has sent me several emails and put out lots of social media about their CES keynote, so hopefully they have something to announce that makes all that hype worth it.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 606   +707
TechSpot Elite
Unfortunately, it doesn't matter how good the AMD CPUs are if the availability isn't there. The OEMs have been staying away from AMD mobile CPUs for the most part. Either because Intel is up to its old tricks or because companies like Quanta don't want to invest in designing an AMD laptop if there won't be enough chips to go around.
 
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Irata

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Unfortunately, it doesn't matter how good the AMD CPUs are if the availability isn't there. The OEMs have been staying away from AMD mobile CPUs for the most part. Either because Intel is up to its old tricks or because companies like Quanta don't want to invest in designing an AMD laptop if there won't be enough chips to go around.
The Lenovo and HP interviews were interesting though. Not sure who said it, but someone said that it wasn‘t enough for AMD‘s CPU to be better, they needed to be so much better that they beat their competition‘s CPU and kickbacks combined.

A reliable supply is also important.
 

HardReset

Posts: 903   +480
The Lenovo and HP interviews were interesting though. Not sure who said it, but someone said that it wasn‘t enough for AMD‘s CPU to be better, they needed to be so much better that they beat their competition‘s CPU and kickbacks combined.

A reliable supply is also important.
That "AMD is not better enough" luckily does not apply on desktop.

Reliable supply important? That's very typical misconception when talking about OEM markets. I give some more:

- Low power consumption is important
- Low TCO is important
- High security is important

None of above are important things on OEM market. Even box of crap is OK, if it has only important thing right: brand.

As I have said before. Desktop buyers are intelligent, server and laptop buyers are stupid. Because desktop buyers buy best product, server and laptop buyers, well, ...
 

Bamda

Posts: 180   +77
Seems more like a victory lap for AMD than any 'big' reveals. The mobile processors we kind of knew were coming so not a big surprise there. AMD also hasn't made a big deal of their keynote. I know Nvidia has sent me several emails and put out lots of social media about their CES keynote, so hopefully they have something to announce that makes all that hype worth it.
AMD keynote smoked NIVIDA. AMD announced a lot of new products, NVIDIA announced 1 desktop graphics card and 3 mobile graphic cards.
 
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Avro Arrow

Posts: 606   +707
TechSpot Elite
The Lenovo and HP interviews were interesting though. Not sure who said it, but someone said that it wasn‘t enough for AMD‘s CPU to be better, they needed to be so much better that they beat their competition‘s CPU and kickbacks combined.

A reliable supply is also important.
So... Intel IS up to their old, illegal tricks! I had a feeling that this was the case, but I hadn't seen any hard evidence. Those kickbacks are EXACTLY why the European Commission fined them €1.06 billion. It seems that Intel hasn't learnt its lesson. I think that it's time for the EU to kick it in the balls again (twice as hard as last time) because we know that the US government is too corrupt to do so.

This is why I don't get how anyone could support that company.
 
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Avro Arrow

Posts: 606   +707
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That "AMD is not better enough" luckily does not apply on desktop.

Reliable supply important? That's very typical misconception when talking about OEM markets. I give some more:

- Low power consumption is important
- Low TCO is important
- High security is important

None of above are important things on OEM market. Even box of crap is OK, if it has only important thing right: brand.

As I have said before. Desktop buyers are intelligent, server and laptop buyers are stupid. Because desktop buyers buy best product, server and laptop buyers, well, ...
Reliable supply is extremely important. It doesn't matter what the brand is if there's no product because without product availability, there is no OEM build.

I'd also caution what you say about desktop vs. laptop and server buyers because you've grossly over-simplified it. People who BUILD desktops are tech-savvy but not all desktop owners are builders. There's a thriving "brand-in-a-box" desktop market with the most clueless customers around (because non-clueless desktop owners tend to be builders).

As for servers, I don't know where you get your ideas because in the server space, performance-per-watt is KING with the brand being irrelevant. When AMD had their Interlagos and then Magny-Cours Opteron server CPUs, they were being bought as fast as AMD could make them because they had superior performance-per-watt due to their (at the time) massive core counts. The Cray Titan was the most powerful supercomputer in the world for a good while and it used AMD Opteron 6274 (Interlagos) CPUs.

If brand was all that mattered, then Intel would never have been caught red-handed. This all happened because Michael Dell was annoyed that Dell servers were falling behind. Dell was so tied to Intel at the time that while competitors like Cray could afford to use the (then) superior Opteron CPUs, Dell could not. He finally broke with Intel so that Dell servers could also feature Opterons.

If server managers were as clueless as you claim, this would never have happened and they wouldn't be server managers in the first place.

As for craptops, it really depends. I would agree that there are a tonne of clueless noobs that buy craptops. However, there's also people like me. I always have a craptop for mobility purposes. I would never buy a high-end craptop because that's just a waste of money (I buy mainstream craptops that will be viable for the long-term) but I wouldn't want to be without one at all.

I only use craptops for really light tasks and I take such good care of them that my old Acer 5560 (AMD A8-3500M) from 2011 still runs fine. I had a hardware problem and decided to buy a new one just because it had been 9 years but I got it working again. It just needed a power button that was $15 on eBay.
 
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Irata

Posts: 1,129   +1,787
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So... Intel IS up to their old, illegal tricks! I had a feeling that this was the case, but I hadn't seen any hard evidence. Those kickbacks are EXACTLY why the European Commission fined them €1.06 billion. It seems that Intel hasn't learnt its lesson. I think that it's time for the EU to kick it in the balls again (twice as hard as last time) because we know that the US government is too corrupt to do so.

This is why I don't get how anyone could support that company.
Oh, they learned their lesson very well. Crime behavior that could be interpreted as not being 100% correct pays.

Let‘s say you robbed a bank, taking a million and were caught.
Now if you got to keep the million but your punishment was a 50,000 fine, why wouldn‘t you keep doing it ?
 

HardReset

Posts: 903   +480
Reliable supply is extremely important. It doesn't matter what the brand is if there's no product because without product availability, there is no OEM build.
Of course there is. Customers just have to wait longer. Considering Intel had very unreliable supply for few years because lack of 14nm capacity on low profit chips (including laptop chips), it's very easy to disagree. It just isn't how it feels to be.

I'd also caution what you say about desktop vs. laptop and server buyers because you've grossly over-simplified it. People who BUILD desktops are tech-savvy but not all desktop owners are builders. There's a thriving "brand-in-a-box" desktop market with the most clueless customers around (because non-clueless desktop owners tend to be builders).

As for servers, I don't know where you get your ideas because in the server space, performance-per-watt is KING with the brand being irrelevant. When AMD had their Interlagos and then Magny-Cours Opteron server CPUs, they were being bought as fast as AMD could make them because they had superior performance-per-watt due to their (at the time) massive core counts. The Cray Titan was the most powerful supercomputer in the world for a good while and it used AMD Opteron 6274 (Interlagos) CPUs.
Builders are very small portion of whole market. Since AMD launched Ryzen, AMD has always gone with "desktop first, laptop last" -route. Laptop market is supposed to be big market but still decides to please small group of builders. AMD is not stupid, they know who appreciate them most.

Again, if performance per watt really matters on servers, then who actually bought "rhymes with Hell" Itanium or worst server chip ever, Pentium 4 Prescott? Well, there were some niche market for Itanic but there were no single valid reason to buy Prescott if performance per watt was important. So again, we can conclude that brand >>> power consumption and everything else.

AMD Opteron sold very poorly in fact. Yeah, it had some success but overall AMD was ditched because, again, brand was wrong.

If brand was all that mattered, then Intel would never have been caught red-handed. This all happened because Michael Dell was annoyed that Dell servers were falling behind. Dell was so tied to Intel at the time that while competitors like Cray could afford to use the (then) superior Opteron CPUs, Dell could not. He finally broke with Intel so that Dell servers could also feature Opterons.

If server managers were as clueless as you claim, this would never have happened and they wouldn't be server managers in the first place.
Just look how "much" server market share AMD got when they got better product on 2001-2002 and total domination 2003-2006:



There is only one relatively small spike but nothing major. Also notice that AMD's share didn't drop very much even AMD didn't have anything to offer for many years. Also because that "spike" came on 2006, 3 years after first Opteron launch, there's no way AMD sold server chips as fast they could make them, so even famous "AMD did not have enough capacity" -explanation does not apply here.

One exception from company that already worshipped Intel doesn't change big picture at all as you can see above.

As for craptops, it really depends. I would agree that there are a tonne of clueless noobs that buy craptops. However, there's also people like me. I always have a craptop for mobility purposes. I would never buy a high-end craptop because that's just a waste of money (I buy mainstream craptops that will be viable for the long-term) but I wouldn't want to be without one at all.

I only use craptops for really light tasks and I take such good care of them that my old Acer 5560 (AMD A8-3500M) from 2011 still runs fine. I had a hardware problem and decided to buy a new one just because it had been 9 years but I got it working again. It just needed a power button that was $15 on eBay.
Good for you. But again, problem is that most laptops goes into companies. Few educated buyers hardly change anything when companies buy gazillions of laptops and only use them for few years. And companies for some reason want Intel. Again, we can safely say that laptop perfemance, battery life etc are not important things. Only brand matters. Despite Intel had very heavy and long term issues with reliable supply. That's exactly what I'm saying here: when looking at big picture, brand is everything and everything else is not.
 

HardReset

Posts: 903   +480
Michael Dell would disagree with you because as far as he was concerned, Dell Enterprise's inability to use Opterons was hurting his company.
It was. Why Dell was even using only Intel chips for long time? Because Intel paid for them. What happened when Michael Dell complained about issue to Intel's Otellini? Intel paid more money for Dell. That complaint was just negotiation tactics so that Intel would pay more for Dell.

Problem solved.

Dell seems to be biggest server supplier right now. They have some AMD systems available but still large majority of their products contain Intel. I cannot see how much that "lack of AMD" Really has hurt them. Largest server provider is one that is also closest to Intel. So yes, brand IS everything.