Hyundai reveals electric-hydrogen hybrid concept car with a retro design

Tudor Cibean

Posts: 119   +8
Staff
Forward-looking: Hyundai's new EV concepts combine performance with unique looks. The N Vision 74 features a hydrogen fuel cell that can pump out up to 95 kW to help the 62.4 kWh battery power the motors. This hybrid design extends range without requiring a heavier battery pack, and you can refuel the hydrogen tanks in just a few minutes.

Hyundai's performance division has unveiled two stunning new concept EVs. These probably won't enter commercial production in their current form, but the company has a good track record of releasing models that look similar to previous concepts.

The N Vision 74 is a hybrid sports car with looks inspired by the company's Pony Coupe concept from 1974 (whose designer went on to make the DeLorean later). It combines a 62.4 kWh battery (with 800V fast-charging capability) with a hydrogen fuel cell to power two motors on the rear, outputting over 670 horsepower and 664 lb-ft of torque. Hyundai claims the EV has a top speed of more than 155 mph (250 km/h), with its range reportedly exceeding 373 miles (600 km).

The N Vision 74 isn't the company's first car based on the Pony Coupe design. In 2019, Hyundai showed off the 45 EV Concept, whose design came to the mass market a few years later with the Ioniq 5.

Hyundai also announced the RN22e, which looks like a preview of an upcoming high-performance version of the Ioniq 6. It uses the same AWD powertrain as the Kia EV6 GT, outputting 577 horsepower and 546 lb-ft of torque. Powering it is a 77.4 kWh battery that can allegedly fast charge from 10 to 80 percent in just 18 minutes. Hyundai says the RN22e can reach a maximum speed of more than 155 mph (250 km/h).

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scavengerspc

Posts: 2,653   +2,871
TechSpot Elite
A "hybrid" without a smoke pump. This is the first hearing about this for me.
Even now, some folks still aren't sure of the difference between a hybrid, an EV, and a plugin hybrid, so I hope if this continues they go out of their way to make it clear, NO GASOLINE!

Maybe it's time to start streamlining the hydrogen delivery process.
It's far from what the geeks call "green" but it much more green than a smoker.
(y) (Y) to Tudor for bringing this here.

I hate it when people force me to change my mind! šŸ˜ 
 
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Fearghast

Posts: 530   +439
Hydrogen is the future. It should've already been in consumer cars by now.
There are Hyundai and Toyota cars on the market already.
But there are another issues entirely - pretty much no hydrogen pumps in your vicinity (certainly not in my country, there is literary ONE place to top up your Mirai), price that is higher than electricity and even higher than gas as distribution is still in its infancy.
... not to mention a way to even make hydrogen is utterly inefficient (right now) with nice promises that it will get much better in future.
Hydrogen is most likely the future, but it certainly is not the present for 99,9999999% of drivers.
 

kira setsu

Posts: 320   +269
There are Hyundai and Toyota cars on the market already.
But there are another issues entirely - pretty much no hydrogen pumps in your vicinity (certainly not in my country, there is literary ONE place to top up your Mirai), price that is higher than electricity and even higher than gas as distribution is still in its infancy.
... not to mention a way to even make hydrogen is utterly inefficient (right now) with nice promises that it will get much better in future.
Hydrogen is most likely the future, but it certainly is not the present for 99,9999999% of drivers.
electrics arent even there unless you're well off.

were gonna be on gas until its dying breath, then go through a few years of horror while we catch up with ev's or hydrogen or whatever we bolt together to take gasolines place, cause thats how we handle everything.

because we won't learn, if people actually gave a damn we'd have a choice of truly affordable ev's with a system that would help people migrate to them already, instead what we get are cars that are either not worth swapping to or priced so high to equal an ice car its just a another bragging point for the rich.
 

mbrowne5061

Posts: 2,024   +1,220
There are Hyundai and Toyota cars on the market already.
But there are another issues entirely - pretty much no hydrogen pumps in your vicinity (certainly not in my country, there is literary ONE place to top up your Mirai), price that is higher than electricity and even higher than gas as distribution is still in its infancy.
... not to mention a way to even make hydrogen is utterly inefficient (right now) with nice promises that it will get much better in future.
Hydrogen is most likely the future, but it certainly is not the present for 99,9999999% of drivers.
IMO, the only future hydrogen has - and is does have a future - is in trucking. Unless battery energy:mass ratios get much better, you'll never see 100% EV trucks. As fossil fuels wind down, that will pretty much just leave hydrogen for shipping trucks.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,828   +6,808
A "hybrid" without a smoke pump. This is the first hearing about this for me.
Even now, some folks still aren't sure of the difference between a hybrid, an EV, and a plugin hybrid, so I hope if this continues they go out of their way to make it clear, NO GASOLINE!
I agree, its an interesting employment of hybridization.
Maybe it's time to start streamlining the hydrogen delivery process.
It's far from what the geeks call "green" but it much more green than a smoker.
My apologies as I am about to burst a bubble. :cold_sweat:

Given that most commercial hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels, according to this article, it produces more CO2 than combusting an energy-equivalent amount of gasoline. https://www.forbes.com/sites/rrapie...print-of-hydrogen-production/?sh=677b4fa324bd

Quoting the relevant paragraph from the article:
This converts to 9.3 kilograms (kg) of CO2 produced per kg of hydrogen production. One kilogram of hydrogen is the energy equivalent of one gallon of gasoline, which produces 9.1 kg of CO2 when combusted.

If research into electrolysis via catalysts pans out, hydrogen is cleaner; however, such research has not yet been commercialized.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,828   +6,808
:rolleyes:Yet another car appealing to the lead-foot who has just got to be able to claim "mine is bigger than yours".
 

mbk34

Posts: 341   +236
electrics arent even there unless you're well off.
I present to you the Citroen Ami ($6K) though I'll admit it might not suit many people's needs. I'll also admit to owning a Begode Nikola Plus ($1.8K) that actually meets even fewer people's needs but is good fun.
 

Fearghast

Posts: 530   +439
electrics arent even there unless you're well off.

were gonna be on gas until its dying breath, then go through a few years of horror while we catch up with ev's or hydrogen or whatever we bolt together to take gasolines place, cause thats how we handle everything.

because we won't learn, if people actually gave a damn we'd have a choice of truly affordable ev's with a system that would help people migrate to them already, instead what we get are cars that are either not worth swapping to or priced so high to equal an ice car its just a another bragging point for the rich.
The electricity is here for more than 10 year, hybrids are here even longer.
The thing is people present ICE to be a big problem, it's not, it's just popular to talk about, to develop, to "solve" in discussion, but it's minor compared to much bigger issues like renewable energy or even least harmful way of producing energy (like nuclear).

I myself I am driving plugin, had a regular hybrid before and diesel before that, but my take on things is not to force people to switch to EVs. Especially now when a lot of the people have enough trouble to provide for much more important things - like food, rent, mortgage.

My point is, if you have resources to do so, switch to something more efficient, at least a hybrid, do you really need to buy a big SUV? Is a 3 ton, 110 kWh EV a good idea in general ... just think about it.

All we can do is to solve a tiny portion of the problem, the rest in on governments and how effectively we would convince governments it's a good idea to start solving these issues. Efficiency is the key.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,653   +2,871
TechSpot Elite
My apologies as I am about to burst a bubble. :cold_sweat:
No problem brother. My daughters say I have that affect on people. :laughing:

Given that most commercial hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels, according to this article, it produces more CO2 than combusting an energy-equivalent amount of gasoline. https://www.forbes.com/sites/rrapie...print-of-hydrogen-production/?sh=677b4fa324bd
I am woefully ignorant on hydrogen as a transportation fuel compared to some. I did know it is a fossil fuel obviously and achieving wide distribution would be a huge expense.

My hope is, as I said earlier, we can not only streamline the process, but maybe even find ways to reduce the emissions needed to get it viable, such as your link. Look at the advancements we made reducing smokers emission levels.

I also think marketing it properly will be very important. Make the people understand that the vehicles are still EVs. They just have a different way of keeping the battery and electric motor going.

I'm going to dedicate some time and learn more about this.
 

TechZel

Posts: 26   +35
Hydrogen is the future. It should've already been in consumer cars by now.

Hydrogen is largely a red herring, provided as an alternative because the current state of politics requires one side to never admit the other side was on the right track, ever.

The electricity grid has existed, and been in a constant state of development and upgrade, for over a century now. Why would we build an entirely new, incomprehensibly expensive infrastructure to support consumer hydrogen vehicles instead? Not to mention that as things stand currently, hydrogen is either just fossil fuel with extra steps, or electric with 30% less efficiency (and therefore even more strain on the electricity grid than BEV).

There's an argument to be made for hydrogen in heavy vehicles as the energy density of current battery tech doesn't scale very well up to their size. But even then, by the time you build out hydrogen tech and enough infrastructure to support heavy vehicles the battery tech may have caught up.
 

Jrfeimst2

Posts: 26   +28
Hydrogen is the future. It should've already been in consumer cars by now.
Uh it costs out the butt to fuel a hydrogen car. It actually cost more to fuel a hydrogen car than to power a car running off 87 octane, even with 4ish dollars a gallon. It also takes way more energy to actually produce hydrogen than to just use an EV car.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,123   +822
I been noticing more Korean boy racer cars around town - normally don't care - but seeing cars I don't recognise - saw a KIA one yesterday, With Korean affluent youth - could compete with Japanese similar cars
 

Mr Majestyk

Posts: 1,266   +1,149
Hydrogen is the future. It should've already been in consumer cars by now.

How is it the future? Maybe fuel cells have a good future, but currently 96% of hydrogen is made from fossil fuels, only 3% is green. As a pure fuel hydrogen is crap, with half the energy density of Li Ion battery. Toyota's ICE burning hydrogen are pretty poor and a waste of effort. Fuel cells have 2x the energy density, but we need clean green source of hydrogen in the first place. Luckily Australian company has had massive breakthrough in catalyst technology for making green hydrogen much cheaper and is readily for commercial trials.

Hydrogen's biggest use will be in manufacturing enabling us to make much cleaner steel, cement etc.
 

Ludak021

Posts: 708   +531
Given that most commercial hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels, according to this article, it produces more CO2 than combusting an energy-equivalent amount of gasoline. https://www.forbes.com/sites/rrapie...print-of-hydrogen-production/?sh=677b4fa324bd

Quoting the relevant paragraph from the article:


If research into electrolysis via catalysts pans out, hydrogen is cleaner; however, such research has not yet been commercialized.
Just watch this, forget Forbes for a moment: