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French "three-strikes" anti-piracy law may be repealed

Hadopi, France's "three-strikes" anti-piracy law, could be in for sweeping changes or even discarded as officials once again ponder the controversial measure. According to the New York Times, France's administration is exploring the closure of the agency tasked with enforcing the…

Nevada is first state to legalize online gambling

Nevada's governor has signed into law a bill which legalizes Internet gambling. Consequently, Nevada has become the first U.S. state to legalize online gambling. The AB114 bill (pdf) also authorizes Nevada to make deals with other states, allowing them to…

Congress passes resolution condemning U.N. Internet "takeover"

In response to a set of Internet eavesdropping standards recently adopted by the International Telecommunications Union, Congress has voted unanimously(!) in favor of a resolution which opposes any sort of U.N. Internet "takeover". Finally, something which American legislators seem to…

Me.ga is new home for MegaUpload, launches 01/19/13

Kim Dotcom and friends are making good on their promise to revive MegaUpload. The popular file sharing destination was abruptly shut down by U.S. officials earlier this year and Kim Dotcom's New Zealand mansion raided by American and New Zealand…

Hulu sued over 24-year old video privacy law

Due to a 1988 video rental privacy law, media streaming outfit Hulu has found itself in a jeopardous position. An anonymous group of individuals are suing Hulu for purported violations of privacy, a charge brought about by sharing users' video watching history…

Former MPAA CTO speaks out against laws like SOPA

Former Motion Picture Association’s Chief Technology Officer Paul Brigner has offered a level-headed rundown regarding the perils of using DNS as a means of Internet enforcement. Once controversial legislation, SOPA relied upon DNS-blocking techniques to essentially take down undesirable websites -- a…

Internet "Bill of Rights" proposed by anti-SOPA lawmakers

Congress critter and California republican Darrell Issa is working on the first draft of what may eventually become the "Digital Bill of Rights" -- legislation which could possibly shape online freedoms and the expectations afforded to citizens of the Internet.…