Ford's all-electric F-150 is good for 300 miles of range and 0-60 mph in the mid-4 second...

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,294   +132
Staff member
Nuts and bolts: Ford said the Lightning targets 563 horsepower and 775 lb-ft of near instantaneous torque, capable of propelling the truck from 0-60 mph in the mid-four second range when equipped with the extended-range battery. The standard-range model targets a maximum payload of 2,000 pounds with a maximum 10,000 pounds of towing capacity on XLT and Lariat trims with the extended-range battery and max trailer tow package.

Ford as promised this week officially unveiled the F-150 Lightning, an all-electric version of the nation’s best-selling vehicle.

The new F-150 Lightning features an all-new frame utilizing “the strongest steel ever put in an F-150 frame,” an aluminum alloy body, new independent rear suspension and dual in-board motors with standard 4x4. It's also the most aerodynamic F-150 ever created, with a sculpted hood and newly shaped running boards to reduce drag.

Ford is offering two battery packages. The standard-range battery will afford an EPA-estimated 230 miles of range while the extended-range option is said to be good for 300 miles on a full charge.

Pricing starts at $39,974 MSRP before any federal or state tax credits for a commercial-oriented entry model and climbs to $52,974 MSRP for a mid-series XLT model.

The first batch of third-gen Lightnings should start rolling off the assembly line in spring 2022. A $100 deposit can reserve your spot in line today.

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Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,505   +1,732
TechSpot Elite
“the strongest steel ever put in an F-150 frame,”
- Does this mean that Ford's been skimping out until now?

It doesn't matter. It's going to be WTFOMGBBQ expensive (to own) and few, if any, people will buy it. Until electrics become affordable to the mass market, they'll just be a gimmick with little to no positive environmental impact. I really do hope that I'm wrong because this is definitely a thing that we need!

But they better not send them to Australia:
 
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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 5,045   +5,651
*10,000 pounds of towing.
*0-60 in 5 seconds or less.
*$40,000 starting price.


An EV "Truck" addresses pretty much all of my issues with EV in general.

#1 It's huge and spacious.

#2 It's "energy efficient". Being able to simply plug it in to my house' 220v rather than have to go to a gas station for $3 gas is unbeatable. It might cost me $30 a month to drive it.

#3 It's got a larger amount of space for more batteries which gives it more Range. 300 MILE Range is really good. I drive, regularly, no more than about 50 miles per day.

#4 The Price, starting at $40,000, is unbeatable. Even at $60,000 I'd be saving a lot of money.

The reason I like Ford's approach over Tesla's is that Ford is a larger company that will more than likely make the EV Truck feel like a standard truck.

Tesla doesn't give you ****in window switches, steering column switches or seat adjustments in the Model 3 and Model Y - unless you go to the touchscreen for everything. I want EV that have the cabin features of a regular car.

Aa a shareholder, I applaud this product as well as the Mustang EV.

Now they need to make an EV EXPLORER.
 

Adhmuz

Posts: 2,166   +963
So with all these so call "targeted" figures, are any of them actual figures?

Lets say there's an extended power outage and after 3 days of powering your house your truck dies, now you have no power in your house and you can't leave because your truck which requires the grid to recharge can't be charged. I guess then you are F'd in the A.

Or what if you are having one of those crazy margarita slow cooker power tool parties on the beach and once again your truck dies, once more would you be F'd in the A?

Well at least you have a Frunk, could just keep a big gas powered generator in there to recharge your battery powered truck and not be stranded with your D in your hand.
 

mbrowne5061

Posts: 1,873   +1,095
It's going to be WTFOMGBBQ expensive and few, if any, people will buy it. Until electrics become affordable to the mass market, they'll just be a gimmick with little to no positive environmental impact.

Have you met F-150 owners? They'll drop $60k-$70k on their trucks at the dealer, and then drop another $10k-$20k in mods into them, and not even blink. At $40k-$55k, these things are going to fly off the dealer floors to all but the most ardent coal-rollers.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 1,394   +1,285
TechSpot Elite
Lets say there's an extended power outage and after 3 days of powering your house your truck dies, now you have no power in your house and you can't leave because your truck which requires the grid to recharge can't be charged. I guess then you are F'd in the A.
So what would you do with a Gasoline vehicle? Go to a gas station and not get any because the power outage means the pumps don't work.
 

DukeJukem

Posts: 198   +184
Well.......I remember how much I wanted a Ford Lightning back in the early 2000's. They LOOKED and sounded so cool. This looks nothing like a ford lightning and I can imagine it doesn't sound like one either. Pretty disappointed to see Ford resurrect something awesome just to make it look nothing like a Lightning. I'd rather pay $20k for an 04 Lightning.
 

Adhmuz

Posts: 2,166   +963
So what would you do with a Gasoline vehicle? Go to a gas station and not get any because the power outage means the pumps don't work.
Well first of all you wouldn't have been running your truck for the last 3 days to power your home's electricity, so it should still have the gas in the tank it had when the power went out, so I'd start it up and drive it to hopefully get supplies to keep the family going, but things are quickly deteriorating without electricity.

By day 4 society will begin to collapse and the classic survival of the fittest scenario will begin to onset, at least you'd have gas in your truck to escape the densely populated sprawl, or can easy come by gas where as with the electric equivalent you'd be completely stranded.

But really there's this that should be enough to satisfy your original question:

 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,505   +1,732
TechSpot Elite
Have you met F-150 owners? They'll drop $60k-$70k on their trucks at the dealer, and then drop another $10k-$20k in mods into them, and not even blink. At $40k-$55k, these things are going to fly off the dealer floors to all but the most ardent coal-rollers.
Well, I work in the automotive industry so... Nope, I've never met hundreds of F-150 owners. :laughing:

I didn't mean that they were going to be expensive to BUY, I meant that they would be expensive to OWN (I should have been more clear) because I can just imagine what the parts for these things are going to cost. They're going to be rather rare because engineers change things for no reason other than to justify their own existence sometimes.

Make no mistake, I really do hope that they succeed because we really need them to. I think that trucks may be the key to making electric vehicles work because their increased payload allows them to carry larger batteries for better range. Since their emissions are no longer an issue and electricity is FAR cheaper than gasoline, they can have some HUGE batteries on them and all that weight won't matter one bit.
 
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Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,505   +1,732
TechSpot Elite
So with all these so call "targeted" figures, are any of them actual figures?

Lets say there's an extended power outage and after 3 days of powering your house your truck dies, now you have no power in your house and you can't leave because your truck which requires the grid to recharge can't be charged. I guess then you are F'd in the A.

Or what if you are having one of those crazy margarita slow cooker power tool parties on the beach and once again your truck dies, once more would you be F'd in the A?

Well at least you have a Frunk, could just keep a big gas powered generator in there to recharge your battery powered truck and not be stranded with your D in your hand.
Well, if you're going to use something as unlikely as a 3-day powerout I can give you a response to it but some of it will be as conjectural as the powerout itself.

1.) Chances are your truck won't be dead empty when it happens.
2.) You could always keep a gas or diesel generator as a "just in case" item.
3.) If you live in a rural area (as many F150 owners do), you could get one of these ingenious things:
 

Adhmuz

Posts: 2,166   +963
I didn't mean that they were going to be expensive to BUY, I meant that they would be expensive to OWN (I should have been more clear) because I can just imagine what the parts for these things are going to cost. They're going to be rather rare because engineers change things for no reason other than to justify their own existence sometimes.
Unfortunately I do not know for sure the drive train layout of these new trucks, however in general electric vehicle drive trains are far less complicated and have far fewer parts to maintain. The rest of the running gear in theory could be common among both gas and electric version of the same truck, it would be in Ford's best interest to do so even as it would lower production costs. The biggest cost would be if a computer blows out or the batteries need to be replaced.
 

seeprime

Posts: 554   +637
When the aluminum-graphene doped batteries, or something that increased battery durability like them, finally make it to production, assuming they can be scaled up, it should increase the range about one third and speed up charging times many fold, so traveling in an EV won't be a potential horror story. Charging stations need to be standardized also. That is when I'll think about an EV for my next vehicle.
 

Adhmuz

Posts: 2,166   +963
Well, if you're going to use something as unlikely as a 3-day powerout I can give you a response to it but some of it will be as conjectural as the powerout itself.

1.) Chances are your truck won't be dead empty when it happens.
2.) You could always keep a gas or diesel generator as a "just in case" item.
3.) If you live in a rural area (as many F150 owners do), you could get one of these ingenious things:
The 3-day power out was mentioned in the video Ford released, just using their theoretical example of the trucks utility. They also fail to mention you would need a transfer switch installed in your house otherwise any power you'd be sending into your house would also be going back into the grid.

I also mentioned having the emergency generator stashed in the Frunk of the Truck, again Frunk was mentioned in the video.

Many people in rural areas may have pickups, however I still see a large number of them in suburban developments, you could have solar and wind energy I suppose to help charge at a slow rate.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 1,394   +1,285
TechSpot Elite
Well first of all you wouldn't have been running your truck for the last 3 days to power your home's electricity, so it should still have the gas in the tank it had when the power went out, so I'd start it up and drive it to hopefully get supplies to keep the family going, but things are quickly deteriorating without electricity.

By day 4 society will begin to collapse and the classic survival of the fittest scenario will begin to onset, at least you'd have gas in your truck to escape the densely populated sprawl, or can easy come by gas where as with the electric equivalent you'd be completely stranded.

But really there's this that should be enough to satisfy your original question:

Who uses a vehicle to power their home? All I would need is a good generator.
It can power my basics and also slow charge a vehicle. All I need is keep maybe 10 gallons of gasoline ready or in my case it can run off propane\natural gas also.

Would you care to take a guess at how many gas stations have a back-up generator....not to mention one that works?

I live in tornado alley and bad storms are quite normal. NOBODY has working pumps during an outage.
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 2,524   +3,824
I find the specs highly suspect. Unless ford has a transmission for the electric motor, which it wont since this has in hub motors, getting 300 miles of range out of a big bulky heavy truck is going to need rediculous batteries. When towing or even just going highway speeds I wouldnt expect more then 200 miles out of the big battery.
No, an EV Bronco. Imagine a 4x4 with 'true' 4WD. Wheel motors, and perfect torque exactly when and where you need it - and never where you don't.
That's called AWD, and off road guys do NOT want that. You want true 4x4, which locks all the wheel sinto the same speed all the time rather then a computer trying to shift power around. You cant predict where the power will be in an AWD system, you can with a proper 4x4 setup where the wheels are physically joined together and forced to spin the same speed. That's why off road guys still use old jeeps and side by sides when off roading.

When the aluminum-graphene doped batteries, or something that increased battery durability like them, finally make it to production, assuming they can be scaled up, it should increase the range about one third and speed up charging times many fold, so traveling in an EV won't be a potential horror story. Charging stations need to be standardized also. That is when I'll think about an EV for my next vehicle.
I'll think of an EV when I can either
A) get 600+ miles of REAL WORLD distance, not "estimated range" ona charge with current 4-8 hour full charge times, or
B) full charge times down to sub 15 minutes

And once chargers become universally available in any parking spot, town city, or anywhere else you may travel, all for the price of current gas cars.
*10,000 pounds of towing.
*0-60 in 5 seconds or less.
*$40,000 starting price.


An EV "Truck" addresses pretty much all of my issues with EV in general.

#1 It's huge and spacious.

#2 It's "energy efficient". Being able to simply plug it in to my house' 220v rather than have to go to a gas station for $3 gas is unbeatable. It might cost me $30 a month to drive it.

#3 It's got a larger amount of space for more batteries which gives it more Range. 300 MILE Range is really good. I drive, regularly, no more than about 50 miles per day.

#4 The Price, starting at $40,000, is unbeatable. Even at $60,000 I'd be saving a lot of money.

The reason I like Ford's approach over Tesla's is that Ford is a larger company that will more than likely make the EV Truck feel like a standard truck.

Tesla doesn't give you ****in window switches, steering column switches or seat adjustments in the Model 3 and Model Y - unless you go to the touchscreen for everything. I want EV that have the cabin features of a regular car.

Aa a shareholder, I applaud this product as well as the Mustang EV.

Now they need to make an EV EXPLORER.
Musk has stated before that you shouldnt expect electric vehicles to be cheap to fuel. Currently tesla charges $0.46/kWh at their superchargers. If this truck had a total capacity of 240kWh, it would cost $113 to fill up. At $3.50 a gallon, a vehicle getting only 10 MPG would be cheaper to run.

As more EVs are adopted, electricity costs will go up. They're already on the rise nationwide. Electric motors are great, but batteries are not worth their weight in scrap metal, and unless we go full france and start building modern nuke plants and upgrading our infastructure EVs are going to have a long uphill battle to fight.
“the strongest steel ever put in an F-150 frame,”
- Does this mean that Ford's been skimping out until now?
No. The F-150 has always been a consumer truck, in the 1/2 ton class. They have never exceeded 6000 lbs, and 905 of the time dont exceed 5500lbs.

This electric truck weighs over 7500 lbs. That is 1 ton F-450 dually territory. The weight of those batteries means the F-150 needs a frame strong enough to hold them, which means metal typically reserved for heavy duty applications.
 
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mbk34

Posts: 185   +123
I didn't mean that they were going to be expensive to BUY, I meant that they would be expensive to OWN (I should have been more clear)
Why would they be expensive to own? Maintenance on EV's is far less than that with ICE vehicles. The motors don't need maintenance though you do still have to pay for tyres and brake maintenance. There's no paying for fuel or need to change oils. Battery degradation is a worry but Teslas sill have over 90% capacity after average use of 150,000 miles. Sure, a vehicle like this won't suit you if you do long mileages but, for most folk, EVs are way cheaper to run. The purchase price doesn't look to bad either compared to other F150 models.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 1,394   +1,285
TechSpot Elite
Musk has stated before that you shouldnt expect electric vehicles to be cheap to fuel. Currently tesla charges $0.46/kWh at their superchargers.
Don't quote me, but I think that comment was from 2011-12. Right now the average cost at an EV station is $0.24 per. In Little Rock on Bass Pro highway it is $0.27 per KWH for a supercharger. If you need less that 60 KW it is $0.15 per.
15 minutes = 200 miles.

I can't remember anyone with an EV ever mentioning charging at a station though. Those are for travelers mostly. Maybe a little for the forgetful types.
 
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psycros

Posts: 3,498   +4,187
Literally nobody who's even marginally informed on the realities of battery power buys that 300-mile range BS. More like 200 if you're lucky - in ideal conditions.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 1,394   +1,285
TechSpot Elite
Literally nobody who's even marginally informed on the realities of battery power buys that 300-mile range BS. More like 200 if you're lucky - in ideal conditions.
Way off, especially since the EPA took over the ratings: