Irdeto buys out Denuvo to pursue anti-cheat measures

Greg S

TS Evangelist

As a heavyweight in the DRM market, Denuvo has put up a good defense against software pirates and crackers alike. Customers ranging from UbiSoft and Electronic Arts to Warner Bros and Lionsgate Entertainment have top tier games relying on Denuvo's software. Now, security firm Irdeto has purchased Denuvo but will not restructure the company.

Operations at Denuvo will continue on as usual. No staff members are being let go from Denvuo's headquarters. The newly acquired business will help Irdeto improve anti-cheat measures put in place for gaming. Denuvo's core will receive an update to include intellectual property from Irdeto Cloakware to strengthen anti-piracy measures.

One focus of anti-cheat methods is preventing in-game economies from being disrupted. Irdeto has realized that "pay-to-win" games can become unplayable or far less satisfying to play if certain gamers are able to avoid microtransactions and are able to obtain add-ons that provide a large advantage. Making it harder to bypass transactions will help keep games with paid extras more fair, but the best solution is still releasing a completed game for one low upfront price.

Although Denuvo has received significant attention for being an innovative software company, it has only been around since 2013. Headquartered in the Netherlands, Irdeto has been in operation for over 50 years and has been providing secure content solutions since the early days of cable TV.

The global gaming market is expected to expand to $128.5 billion by 2020, making Denuvo an invaluable asset for Irdeto to have under its control.

Permalink to story.

 

yRaz

Nigerian Prince
The thing that I find hilarious about DRM is that the strongest is usually on games no one wants to play. Developers that make good games usually don't have strong DRM or DRM at all.

DRM is the dumbest thing in the world. The people who pirate games probably wouldn't buy them in the first place so it only punishes the people who pay for it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Reehahs and BSim500

GeforcerFX

TS Evangelist
The thing that I find hilarious about DRM is that the strongest is usually on games no one wants to play. Developers that make good games usually don't have strong DRM or DRM at all.

DRM is the dumbest thing in the world. The people who pirate games probably wouldn't buy them in the first place so it only punishes the people who pay for it.
The new DRM is no where near the hassle of the old school ubisoft and secure ram crap. I just got hit with activation DRM in my 10 year old copy of GTA IV, game activates with rockstar just fine, but not on Windows live. Pretty much all major EA, Ubisoft, Activision, and Take 2 games have some type of DRM, Ubi and EA favor denuvo, these are all the major AAA guys pretty much.
 

ShagnWagn

TS Evangelist
"keep games with paid extras more fair"

LOL. Let all the id10t's who blow thousands of $$$ play against other id10t's. They would rather compete on who spends the most money. Let people who actually enjoy the game play on a level playing field.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Reehahs

complexxL9

TS Booster
I am all for cheating in pay-2-win games, not that I play any of these type of games, but I find this hilarious.
 

yRaz

Nigerian Prince
The new DRM is no where near the hassle of the old school ubisoft and secure ram crap. I just got hit with activation DRM in my 10 year old copy of GTA IV, game activates with rockstar just fine, but not on Windows live. Pretty much all major EA, Ubisoft, Activision, and Take 2 games have some type of DRM, Ubi and EA favor denuvo, these are all the major AAA guys pretty much.
I would argue that it's worse because many single player games require an internet connection to play. There is an 'offline mode" for many digital platforms but that's just a bandaid. If I'm on a loaded network and my connection gets dropped I get kicked out of a single player game. It's actually easier to use a cracked than a DRM game which makes the pirated product the better one. It's gotten to the point that If a game im interested in comes out I pirate it first. If I like it I buy it.

this is more than about how much of a hassle DRM is. This is about how DRM is used to try to force gamers to buy a game before if they know they like it. Whatever happened to demos? Give gamers access to the first few levels of the game. DRM is still a hassle, though, developers have just gotten better at hiding it.

the whole idea that after I pay for something I'm only paying for the right to use it and they reserve the right to revoke that right at anytime is absurd. While this never happens in single player games you are still only paying for the right to use their software, you do not own it.

I remember when videogames were actually fun but, ****, maybe I'm just getting old