Here's how to bypass Windows 11's TPM and CPU requirements

nanoguy

Posts: 979   +14
Staff member
In brief: Windows 11 comes with some rather strict system requirements and most notably calls for the presence of a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0 in your PC. However, there's an easy way to go around these requirements, and it only takes a few minutes to do it yourself.

Microsoft has done an abysmal job of communicating the Windows 11 system requirements and the exact reasons behind them. Since unveiling the new operating system in June, it has only confused everyone by changing these details on the fly. Much of this confusion stems from the company’s insistence that PCs running Windows 11 need support for something called Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0—a previously unheard-of security feature outside of enterprise environments.

The short of it is that Microsoft wanted to launch Windows 11 with an additional layer of security enabled by default, and TPM 2.0 was central to that strategy since the advanced security features in the new operating system depend on it. If you’re looking for an in-depth explanation of what TPM is and why Windows 11 requires it, check out our explainer.

The bad news is that Microsoft is okay with splitting the Windows user base with this requirement, even though Windows 11 comes with some important quality of life improvements over Windows 10. The good news is that if you want to run Windows 11, you can easily bypass it in more than one way. Before we go into how to do this, understand that while Microsoft allows it, you won't be offered the same level of support and aren't entitled to receive any feature or security updates.

Perhaps ironically, Microsoft itself has provided a way to go around the TPM 2.0 requirement as part of the official Windows 11 documentation. That said, this method still requires that your system be compatible with TPM 1.2. As a rule of thumb, if your PC is equipped with an AMD Ryzen 1000 series CPU or newer, or an Intel 7th generation Kaby Lake CPU or newer, you should have support for TPM 1.2 or even TPM 2.0.

Checking for TPM 1.2 support is as easy as opening Device Manager and expanding the “Security devices” section. Alternatively, you can press Win + R on your keyboard to open the Run dialog. Type “tpm.msc” and hit OK to open the TPM Management snap-in, which should tell you right away if you have a compatible TPM module.

If you don't see any mention of "Trusted Security Platform Module," check your UEFI settings—usually found in the Advanced tab—and enable a feature called "PTT" for Intel systems and "PSP fTPM" for AMD systems. This setting will be necessary on most consumer PCs, where OEMs usually don't enable this feature from the factory.

After adjusting the setting, you need to add a Registry key manually. To do that, search for “Registry Editor” from Start, and launch it. In the address box, insert “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup” and press Enter. Add a DWORD value, name it “AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU,” and set it to 1. Then create a bootable USB or DVD with the Media Creation Tool, launch setup, and perform an in-place upgrade on your system.

If you want to perform a clean install and use an even older CPU, you can also perform an unofficial bypass on the TPM and CPU checks during the Windows installation process. As you run through the required steps, you’ll quickly run into a message saying, “This PC can’t run Windows 11.” You’re going to prove the message box wrong by going back a step and then hitting Shift + F10 on the keyboard to open a Command Prompt window. Type “regedit” and hit Enter. Just like with the above method, it’ll open the Registry Editor. Type “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup” in the address bar and hit Enter. Right-click on Setup and add a new Key called “LabConfig.”

In the LabConfig Key, add a DOWRD value called “BypassTPMCheck” and set it to 1. Then add another one called “BypassCPUCheck” and set that to 1 as well. Repeat the same process with “BypassSecureBootCheck.” A word of caution, however, you might be tempted to try “BypassRAMCheck” or “BypassStorageCheck,” but it’s not worth it. If you don’t meet the minimum storage or RAM requirements, it’s better to stick with Windows 10 for now.

That’s all it takes to bypass the TPM and processor requirements and install Windows 11. Below you have shortcuts to Windows 11 downloads, reviews, and a couple of fixes for annoyances you may find in the new operating system:

Permalink to story.

 

Dimitriid

Posts: 1,126   +2,142
...even though Windows 11 comes with some important quality of life improvements over Windows 10

Like what? Haven't heard a single thing that's actually a "quality of life improvement"

Stop trying to rehabilitate Microsoft and Windows 11 if they want to botch the release, just let them. This is just very lousy advice from a supposedly "tech" site.
 

Nobina

Posts: 3,344   +3,436
Microsoft probably won't fix these loopholes cause the only thing they'll get is more backlash.
 

BSim500

Posts: 858   +1,977
That’s all it takes to bypass the TPM and processor requirements
It sounds like the entirety of Windows 11 Super Ultra Mega TPM Enhanced Security that blocks half the world's hardware as being "insecure" resembles this (link)...
 

Ben Myers

Posts: 148   +63
I still can't believe MICROSOFT is doing this. There really is more to the reason that most of us don't know.
The reason is simple and out there in public for all of us to see. The glib response is to call Windows 11 "The Computer Sales Act of 2021". The holiday shopping season is coming and what better way to sell more hardware and more copies of Windows 11 and more rentals of Microsoft 365 than to have a bright and shiny operating system to go with all the new computers sold in stores and online? After all, declaring that 90% of all computers in the world can't run Windows 11 should cause massive stampedes to Walmart, Amazon and other fine places that sell computer gear. There may even be shortages, as there are with graphics cards, a boon to retailers who can sell equipment at prices higher MSRP. Be careful where you go on Black Friday!

Warning to all: A fool and his money are soon parted.
 

Slappy McPhee

Posts: 207   +131
I cannot see any reason at all to move to Win11 unless you are some security conspiracy theorist nutjob and then if you are you already are doing a heap ton to protect yourself. This debacle is in perfect timing for Intel to be releasing their new GPUs and then of course the GPUaggedon that is happening (continuation of the garbage from late 2017 into 2018). Even though my rigs meet the TMP requirements I have no plans to move to Win11 from 10 for a good while. Linux is also a solid option.
 

TheBigT42

Posts: 577   +544
Copy the Windows 11 install .wim file to a Windows 10 USB Installer.

Then do a clean install....like ALL OS installations should be.

NEVER UPGRADE WINDOWS!
 

ferrellsl

Posts: 55   +53
For clean installs, the simplest way is to use Rufus to create an install disk that bypasses these checks.
I never could get a rufus installer to ignore the TPM requirement but it would allow me to bypass the CPU checks. The tool that worked perfectly for me to bypass both the TPM and CPU checks was the one listed earlier in this thread as found on github. https://github.com/AveYo/MediaCreationTool.bat

The github script worked perfectly for me on a Chuwi LarkBox and a Beelink TV box, both of which lacked TPM modules and have N4000 series Celeron CPUs.
 

Markoni35

Posts: 1,303   +521
My latest prediction:
In the near future we'll learn that by using specially formatted TCP/IP packets, TPM enables attackers to wake up your PC, log in remotely (even if no OS is installed), copy or insert data, and shut down your computer, without leaving a trace.
 
What I'm disappointed about is...
Ms labeled Win 11 as having better gaming performance than 10, when in fact almost every game looses performance under Win 11.
Apparently its because of VBS and HVCI security measures. My question is, can both of these be disabled, and if so, why aren't Win gaming reviews being done them disabled? Who wants to move to a new OS that supposed to be more snappy and cleaner, but give up gaming performance.
 

cliffordcooley

Posts: 13,000   +6,315
Somehow I get the feeling Microsoft knows Windows 11 will fail. Which is why they don't care how these hardware requirements are perceived. Microsoft seems to be setting the stage for Windows 12 adoption. The release of Windows 11 was all wrong. Pushed out the door and only supports the last 4 years of hardware. Microsoft has to know that leads to less machines than Windows 8 had installed.
 

Puiu

Posts: 4,957   +3,830
TechSpot Elite
I never could get a rufus installer to ignore the TPM requirement but it would allow me to bypass the CPU checks. The tool that worked perfectly for me to bypass both the TPM and CPU checks was the one listed earlier in this thread as found on github. https://github.com/AveYo/MediaCreationTool.bat

The github script worked perfectly for me on a Chuwi LarkBox and a Beelink TV box, both of which lacked TPM modules and have N4000 series Celeron CPUs.
Didn't they update the Rufus application recently to include this option?

From the Rufus 3.16 Beta 2 patch notes:
- Add Windows 11 "Extended" installation support (Disables TPM/Secure Boot/RAM requirements)
- Improve Windows 11 support
- Improve Windows version reporting

But to be fair, the beta is not really visible in the rufus main website, just in the downloads and github.

https://rufus.ie/downloads/
 
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