Intel articles

Core i7-7800X vs. 7700K, 6 or 4 Cores for Gaming?

Although we consider the Ryzen 5 1600 to be the sweet spot for building a new high-end gaming rig, many of you interested in going Intel want to know whether it makes more sense to buy the Core i7-7700K or the new 7800X? There's just a ~$70 difference between the two: the older chip is higher clocked, while the newer CPU gets you two extra cores and access to Intel's latest desktop platform.

Intel Core i9-7900X review roundup, i7-7820X brings "value" to the table

The Core i9-7900X is a 10-core, 20-thread processor that can overclock to 4.6 GHz with ease according to initial reviews, easily becoming the most powerful desktop processor you could buy, but the problem is at $1,000 the Core i9 loses some of its appeal. Of course, AMD’s ThreadRipper processors are on the horizon. If a 16-core ThreadRipper performs as strong as many expect it to and arrives at a lower price point than the Core i9, Intel may have to reconsider on the pricing front. In the meantime, a handful of reviews for the Core i7 7740X and Core i7 7820X are also out, the latter offering close enough numbers to the i9-7900X at a fraction of the price.

New Intel HD Graphics driver for DiRT 4 and Tekken 7

Unlike Nvidia or AMD, Intel is not known for releasing graphics drivers to coincide with new game releases, but this time they've paved the way for DiRT 4 and Tekken 7. The latest HD Graphics drivers come optimized for these two titles and also solves key issues in Battlefield 1, Star Wars Battlefront, Mass Effect: Andromeda, Rise of the Tomb Raider, and others. Release notes and files download are available from our drivers section for Windows 10, 8.1, and 7 64-bit.

45 Years Later: Die photos and analysis of the revolutionary 8008 microprocessor

Intel's groundbreaking 8008 microprocessor was first produced 45 years ago, the ancestor of the x86 processor family that you may be using right now. While the 8008 wasn't the first microprocessor or even the first 8-bit microprocessor, it was truly revolutionary, triggering the microprocessor revolution and leading to the x86 architecture that dominates personal computers today.